Translational inhibition due to CHEAP RETIN-A the fact that the path of the excitation occurs Br neuron. recurrent inhibition     Carried intercalary brake cells (Renshaw). Axons of buy nolvadex online canada motor neurons often give collaterals (branches), ending with Renshaw cells. Renshaw cell axons terminate on the body or dendrites of the motor neuron, forming inhibitory synapses. Arousal that occurs in motor neurons travel in a straight path to the skeletal muscle, as well as collaterals to inhibitory neurons, which send impulses to motoneurons and inhibits them. The stronger the motor neuron excitation, the more excited Renshaw cells and the more intense they exert their inhibitory effect, which protects nerve cells from overstimulation. lateral inhibition    
 

[ Masterweb Reports: Intersociety reports ] - (Legislative Accountability, Onitsha Nigeria, 20th May 2015)-Summation: This part (three) concludes the extensively researched appraisal of the parliamentary stewardship of the outgoing Seventh National Assembly of Nigeria. The appraisal was extended to the State Houses of Assembly for the purpose of setting the records straight and putting in public domain and consciousness of Nigerians the fundamental standard of measuring the modern public lawmaking functions in Nigeria. In the course of the referenced extensive research by ours ( International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law- Intersociety), it was indisputably established that parliamentary quackery and mercantilism have steadily remained the bane of the lawmaking processes in Nigeria since the arrival of the Fourth Republic National Assembly (1999-2003).
 
Through parliamentary quackery, status quo or lazy lawmaking became the order of the day and characterized the National Assembly of Nigeria. Legislative intellectualism was nowhere to be seen. This resulted to abandonment of numerous laws of the Federation needing attention and begging to be upgraded or repealed including archaic provisions of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria 1999. Several legislative items that ought to be legislated into law including numerous treaties and conventions were left abandoned. Through parliamentary mercantilism, the lawmaking processes in Nigeria became grossly commercialized and compromised. Most, if not all public interest legislative items and issues, which are usually inducement and bribery free, were abandoned or relegated for subsidiary legislative functions like legislative probes, constituency projects, budgetary legislation, etc, which took precedence over the former. The State Houses of Assembly, within the referenced period became and still remain the appendages of the State Executive Councils. The five main bribery induced areas that have dominated the legislative businesses of the State Houses of Assembly in Nigeria till date are budget defense/passage, approval of commissioners/office appointments, consideration of executive borrowings, approval of security votes and legislative probes.
 
Fundamental Challenges Before The Eight Republic National Assembly: It remains an indisputable fact that Nigeria as a multi cultural democratic country can never make any meaningful progress unless its present politico-legal system is surgically operated and re-arranged. The present system under reference created and bequeathed to the country by the Fourth Republic National Assembly (1999-2003) is anti democratic and enemy of development. A politico-legal system that promotes primordialism and signs away 80% of the country’s commonwealth into the pockets of a ruling political class of 17,500 citizens who constitute only 0.010% of the country’s 170 million people; urgently requires radical re-visitation and re-distribution; else Nigeria will chronically continue to crawl in its all socio-political ramifications. For Nigeria to face realities of modern time and wriggle itself of present socio-political doldrums there must be radical re-distribution of the country’s commonwealth so as to aggregate and congregate enough funds for the general and optimum development of the country. To do this, the country’s fiscal laws and policies particularly on wage allowances and government overheads in all its arms and tiers of government must be cut down by 50% across board.

 
Radical Review Of Allowances & Overheads: Our study into the present state of public workers’ salaries and pensions of the pensioners in Nigeria clearly shows that workers’ salaries and pensioners’ pensions are not responsible for the present situation whereby government and governance are totally premised on recurrent and overheads criminal governance. The Eight Republic National Assembly of Nigeria and their States counterparts must also repeal all existing Special Life Pension Laws and Schemes for all categories of executive and legislative public office holders both at the Federal and States level. The most criminal part of the official misapplication and misappropriation of public funds called “security votes and service-wide votes” and their likes must be cut down by 60% across board in the case of the President and the Governors and total abolition in the case of other top public office holders including the Senate President, the Speaker of the House of Reps and Speakers of the State Houses of Assembly; likewise drastic downward review of their overheads. Allocation of a whopping sum of N231 billion ($1.15 billion) to the so called “service-wide votes” in the 2015 federal budget; for instance, is a height of presidential criminality. This is more so when only N557 billion ($2.75 billion) was allocated to the capital expenditures in 2015, while an alarming sum of N2.6 trillion ($10.3 billion) was allocated to recurrent expenditures.
 
The allowances component of the personnel costs as well as the overheads component of the recurrent expenditures is fully responsible for paucity of funds for capital development in Nigeria. And if nothing radical is done to reverse the dangerous trend, then Nigeria will chronically remain empty and nothing in terms of real growth and development. Our study also shows clearly that if the above referenced overheads including security votes as well as public allowances are reviewed downwards, over N1 trillion ($5 billion) will be saved yearly from Federal, States and LGAs and channeled into capital expenditures for the development of Nigeria and Nigerians. For instance, a 50% cut in the N550.8 billion ($2.75 billion) spent yearly in the allowances of the country’s 11,788 Local Government officials automatically saves and recovers N275 billion ($1.37 billion) for Nigerians. Another major task before the incoming Federal and States legislatures in Nigeria lies on the need to quarantine public loans/borrowings particularly from local sources. If the borrowings must be granted, then they must be for productive use including job creation and government revenue yielding. As a matter of fact, there is need for a national moratorium on public borrowings in Nigeria.
 
Archaic Constitutional & Statutory Provisions/Policies: In addition to the foregoing, the Eight Republic National Assembly must review the country’s state of 33 solid mineral deposits as well as the continuous power epilepsy in the country for the purpose of their mechanization or industrialization. This can be done by the referenced Federal legislatures by re-visiting the country’s trade and investment policies and laws including the Land Use Act, industrial, environmental, import and export laws. The privatization of power in the country must be reviewed and possibly revoked.
 
On the age-long ethno-religious violence afflicting the country, the Eight Republic National Assembly must re-visit Section 10 of the 1999 Constitution for the purpose of re-phrasing it to literally suit the country’s secular and multi-religious status. Promotion and encouragement of any form of State religion must be prohibited and criminalized. The right to the freedom of religion in Section 38 of the Chapter Four of the Constitution must be strengthened. In the case of existing socio-religious criminal laws like Shariah Laws of the Northern States which existence threatens the 1999 Constitution and the secular status of Nigeria; there is need to return to the status quo. This means returning to the Penal Code (operational in Northern Nigeria). The Penal Code is a combination of Islamic and non Islamic Criminal laws, borrowed from Sudan. The Penal Code under reference is also overdue for amendment and upgrading.

 
There is also need for the incoming National Assembly to create Ethno-Religious Violence & Related Offenses Commission so as to manage the country’s age-long religious and ethnicity violence and related disturbances including arrest and trial of the perpetrators and their sponsors. The victims and their families should also be entitled to adequate compensations from the government. Dates should be set aside for National Sorry & Remembrance Day for dead victims of the referenced violence and related disturbances. Creation of Electoral Violence & Related Offenses Commission is also long overdue in Nigeria. In the area of non domestication of various international treaties and conventions highlighted in the part two of the report, the incoming Eight Republic National Assembly must identify them and pass them into law as urgently as possible.
 
Another important task facing the incoming Eight National Assembly and their States counterparts is the need to legislatively correct the monumental imbalances in the number and geopolitical allocation of States, Local Government Areas (LGAs), Senatorial Districts and Federal Constituencies in Nigeria. It is extremely important to inform that the country’s commonwealth and public office personnel are distributed in accordance with Section 14 (3) of the Constitution according to number of States, LGAs, Senatorial Districts and Federal Constituencies allocated to each federating unit (State) or geopolitical zone. In the world over, population, not landmass is a pivotal criterion for allocation of resources and demographic dividends. It is, therefore, shocking and disheartening to observe the present gross lopsidedness in the allocation of LGAs in a democratic Nigeria per geopolitical zone, which is as follows: Northwest (186), Northeast (112), North-central (115), Southwest (138), South-south (123) and Southeast (95). Kano and Jigawa States (formerly one State) alone have 77 LGAs.
 
In the area of Federal Constituencies, which are designed in such a way that the transfer of national resources and distribution of public office personnel are anchored on proportionality; the referenced lopsidedness is very pronounced as follows: Northwest (92), Northeast (48), North-central (49), Southwest (71), South-south (55) and Southeast (43). The allocation of Senatorial Districts and States is also proactively lopsided. While the Southeast zone is the least with 15 Senatorial Districts; Southwest, South-south, North-central and Northeast have 18 districts each, whereas the Northwest zone has 21. In the number of States, the Southeast is the least with 5 States, while North-central, Northeast, South-south and the Southwest zones are allocated with 6 States each. The Northwest zone has the highest number of States with 7 States. We demand firmly that the monumental imbalances above highlighted be legislatively re-visited and corrected. There should be balanced number of LGAs per geopolitical zone; else let the LGA system be removed from the Constitution and handed over to the States.
 
Further to the foregoing is the need for the incoming Eight National Assembly of Nigeria to amend and upgrade the Criminal Code (operational in the Southern Nigeria) and the Penal Code (operational in Northern Nigeria) to bring them in conformity with the new Criminal Procedural Act (ACJ 2015) and the Evidence Act (amended in 2011) as well as to factor them into modern electronic criminal investigation, evidence, prosecution and sentencing management. To this effect too, the ouster clauses under the right to personal liberty provisions in Section 35 of the 1999 Constitution in the Chapter Four or the Fundamental Human Rights should be thoroughly reviewed and streamlined. For instance, there must be an end to criminal investigations and trials in Nigeria. Specifically, Section 35 (4) (5) (6) (7) must be revisited; otherwise the aim of passing into law the Administration of Criminal Justice Act of 2015 will be defeated.
 
Other provisions of the 1999 Constitution requiring attention of public importance are Section 18 (3) (free education) and Section 6 (6) (c) (non justiciablity of the Chapter Two). The phrase “when practicable” should be deleted as it concerns free primary and secondary education with their adult literacy programs. Also paragraph “c” in Section 6 (6) should be deleted to judicially empower Nigerians to hold the political office holders accountable at all times with respect to the Fundamental Objectives & Directive Principles of the State Policy of the Constitution(Sections 13-23). Section 12 (3) of the same 1999 Constitution requiring a majority of the Houses of Assembly passage of a national law before a treaty or convention can be domesticated; should be done away with. The passage of the domesticating law should be restricted to the National Assembly and the Presidency.
 
Intellectualizing The Lawmaking Processes In Nigeria: It is indisputable to assert that lawmaking processes in Nigeria since 1999 have failed woefully and fallen below the international standards. For the country to catch up with its peers regionally and internationally, it must have vibrant and cerebral Federal and State Legislatures. To this effect, members of the Eight Republic National Assembly and their States counterparts must purge themselves of mercantile dispositions and brace up for humanist and selfless national and State legislative assignments. These involve use of local contents or constant consultations with, and visits to their constituencies/constituents so as to stay in tune with their socio-economic realities and challenges with a view to addressing them legislatively.
 
There is also need for them to embrace modern within the border and across the border legislative data mining. In other words, there are three intellectual dimensions to modern legislative functions across the world. The first is local/constituency intellectual legislative dimension, which involves harnessing relevant constituency legislative challenges for upright legislative attention. The within the border intellectual legislative dimension involves exploring and exploiting national social legislative realities for the purpose of harnessing and addressing them legislatively. The third is across the border intellectual legislative dimension, which involves realization that the world is a global village and an aggregation and congregation of ideas including legislative ideas for the purpose of selling to others the best you have and buying from them the best they have including their legislative best. The totality of this is called legislative intellectualism.
 
To achieve the foregoing, the incoming Federal and State Legislatures and their members must de-mercantilize and demystify lawmaking processes in Nigeria and collectively and individually create rooms for parliamentary amicus curiae for the purpose of ensuring truly public oriented legislative functions including passage of human rights and public interest and development friendly bills. To ensure legislative intellectualism, in-depth and extensive researches are needed as well as robust relationships with expert-institutions, bodies and personnel. In this era of cheap information technology provided by internet, every constituency office of a Federal or State legislator must be computerized and electronically connected and stocked with all relevant open-source information pertaining to key legislative decisions including bills passed and oversight findings made as per executive activities of relevant ministries, agencies, departments and parastatals as well as their non government counterparts like multinational corporations and key educational and health institutions. Every Nigerian citizen must be able to access and assess all legislative information in Nigeria or any part thereof.

 
A modern legislative chamber that disconnects itself from robust and constant interface with rights based Civil Society Organizations and scholars and experts footed in natural and social science disciplines including those in the Bench, Bar, Juridical, Criminology, Security Studies, Medicine, Pharmacy, Sociology, Theology, Politics, Diplomacy, Economics, Environmental Safety and Human Rights, is obviously a legislative chamber of pre-Athenian age. On the other hand, modern lawmaking membership requires being a thinker, a nimble, and a virile agent of social change and a graduate of legislative studentship.  
 
Finally, ideology is found lacking in Nigerian politics and legislative chambers. Average Nigerian politician or lawmaker is a political trader and harlot. Lack of political ideology also leads to absence of political and economic think tanks in the country. In the USA, there are the National Republican Institute and the National Democratic Institute. There are various security and safety think tanks affiliated or sympathetic to either Republican Party or Democratic Party. There must be sound political ideology in Nigeria. The National Assembly of Nigeria is also deeply parasitic and consumptive. Owing to its quackery and mercantilist composition, it lacks the capacity to attract funds from development and donor agencies.
 
The oversight committees that ought to attract local and international corporate funding are busy chasing their executive oversight bodies around looking for little loopholes for the purpose of enriching their pockets at the expense of their constituencies/constituents and generality of Nigerians. To succeed, the Eight Republic National Assembly and their States counterparts must depart from the referenced mercantilist, primordial and parochial legislative direction and embrace humanist, selfless and intellectual dimensions to lawmaking.
 
Signed:
 
Emeka Umeagbalasi, B.Sc. (Hons) Criminology & Security Studies
Board Chairman, International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law
+2348174090052(office)
info@intersociety-ng.org, emekaumeagbalasi@yahoo.co.uk
 
Uzochukwu Oguejiofor, Esq., (LLB, BL), Head, Campaign & Publicity Department
 
Chiugo Onwuatuegwu, Esq., (LLB, BL), Head, Democracy & Good Governance Program

 
*Photo Caption – As seen.

[ Masterweb Reports: Press Release For Immediate Release ] - His Excellency, the Executive Governor of Abia State, Chief T.A.Orji, has approved the renaming of the following structures in the state:
 
1. E-Library at Ogurube Layout Umuahia now renamed Dr. Ogbonnaya Onu
E-Library.
2. 1st Wing of New Civil Service Secretariat Umuahia now renamed
G.C.Okezie Block.
3. 2nd Wing of New Civil Service Secretariat Umuahia now renamed A.E.N.
Izuwa Block.
4. Housing Estate on Adelabu Street Umuahia now renamed Amaokwe Housing
Estate.
5. Housing Estate at Old Timber Shed Umuahia now renamed Ohobo Housing
Estate.
6. Housing Estate at former Ministry of Lands Umuahia now renamed N.C.
Okoronkwo Estate.
7. New JAAC Building now renamed Prof. Eni Njoku Building.
8. New ASUBEB Building now renamed Jaja Nwachukwu Building.
 
Signed:
 
Charles Ajunwa
CHIEF PRESS SECRETARY TO THE GOVERNOR
 
*Photo Caption - Governor T. A. Orji of Abia State, Nigeria.

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*Photo Caption - As seen.

[ Masterweb Reports: Intersociety reports ] - (Parliamentary Accountability, Onitsha Nigeria, 18th May 2015)-Archaic Laws/Legislative Items Begging For Attention: There are numerous archaic Acts of the Federation and Laws of the States begging for legislative attention as it concerns their amendments or repealing. There are also hundreds of new legislative items waiting to be legislated into law for improved order and good governance of the country or any part thereof. Yet, the present legislative chambers at the Federal and State levels have turned blind eyes on them and stuck to the pursuit of illicit or ill-gotten wealth and other primordial interests. In the Criminal Justice sector, most of the criminal laws at the Federal and State levels have remained archaic. Except late minute (March 2015) passage of the Administration of Criminal Justice Act, which President Goodluck Jonathan signed into law few days ago; many others are left outdated.
 
The Police Act of 1930 labeled the NPF Act of 2004 is still in use. Others are the Firearms Act of 1990, the Robbery & Firearms Act of 1984, the Prisons’ Act of 1972, the Private Guards Act of 1986, the Children & Young Persons Act of 1944, the Juvenile Court System, the Federal High Court Act of 1973, the Custom & Excise Act, and the Immigration Act. There are also other Acts relating to the country’s Court and Criminal Justice systems and their procedures found inconsistent with present realities. The EFCC Act and the ICPC Act of 2004 still lack adequate penalties for convicted white collar criminals as well as other weak provisions or ouster clauses.
 
There are civil Acts of the Federation begging for amendment and upgrading to be brought in tune with present socio-cultural realities. They include the National Open University Act of 1983, the National Universities Commission Act of 1974 and the Nigerian Traffic Warden Act (Decree) of 1975, to mention but few. In the areas of trade, investment and management of natural resources, there are archaic Acts related to them requiring upgrading as well as new bills needed to be put in place. One of such important bills is the PIB (Petroleum Industry Bill), which has laid un-passed at the National Assembly since 2007. At the States level, similar cases are obtainable. Most of their laws are anachronistic and anti modernity. Some States still retain colonial period Magistrate/Area/District Courts and Coroner’s laws.
 
Abandoned International Treaties & Conventions: One of the major ways to rate and respect a democratic country regionally and internationally is its regional, international and municipal (full) involvement in the implementation of international multilateral or bilateral agreements. To do this, there are three processes called signing, ratification/accession and domestication particularly in the case of Nigeria. The non-domestication of these treaties and conventions render them inoperable and un-enforceable in the country or any part thereof. By Section 12 (1) of the 1999 Constitution: No treaty between the Federation and any other country shall have the force of law except to the extent to which such treaty has been enacted into law by the National Assembly.

 
Section 12 (2) states as follows: The National Assembly may make laws for the Federation or any part thereof with respect to matters not included in the Exclusive Legislative list for the purpose of implementing a treaty. By Section 12 (3): A bill for an Act of the National Assembly passed pursuant to the provisions of subsection 2 of this section shall not be presented to the President for assent, and shall not be enacted unless it is ratified by a majority of all the Houses of Assembly in the Federation. The above mentioned fundamental constitutional requirements and duties imposed on the National and the State Legislatures particularly the outgoing Seventh National and State Assemblies are grossly observed in breach and with reckless abandon. While the Federal Executive Council is charged with the task of signing and ratifying treaties, the National Assembly and the State Legislatures are constitutionally charged with the responsibility of enacting or domesticating them into law.
 
Despite the creation and existence of the Senate and the House of Reps Committees on Treaties & Agreements with public funds fully allocated to them as and when necessary; it is clearly observed that most of the country’s ratified treaties and conventions have not been domesticated till date. Domestication processes of any treaty can either originate from a Private Member bill initiation or Executive bill process. Combination of these has denied Nigerians rights and privileges associated with these treaties and conventions including right of individual citizens to complain and get justice. Treaties and Conventions include arms trade, environmental security and safety, trade and investment, maritime, offensive and hazardous technological and chemical substances, aviation safety, human rights and humanitarian issues.
 
Non-Domesticated Treaties & Conventions: Nigeria has one of the world best records of ratifying key regional and international treaties, yet it retains notoriety as one of the modern countries with least number of domesticated treaties and conventions. One of the country’s newest ratifications is the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which came into force on 24th December 2014. Nigeria ratified it in August 2013, yet it has not been domesticated. Another newest ratification is the UN Convention against Corruption of 14th December 2005, which Nigeria ratified on 14th December 2014. It is yet to be domesticated by the National Assembly. The Chemical Weapons Convention of 29th April, 1997, which Nigeria ratified on 20th May, 1999, is yet to be domesticated. There is also the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change of 1992 & its Protocols. Though Nigeria has ratified them, but they are yet to be domesticated. The same thing applies to the Convention on Biological Diversity of 1992, which Nigeria ratified on 27th November 1994. There is yet another important convention called UN Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs & Psychotropic Substances of 1988, ratified by Nigeria on 1st November 1989. It is yet to be domesticated.
 
In the area of humanitarian treaties, Nigeria is yet to domesticate the UN Convention on the Status of Refugees of 1951 & its Protocol, which the country ratified on 23rd October 1967 and 2nd May 1968 respectively. The Genocide Convention of December 9, 1948, which Nigeria ratified on 27th July 2009, is yet to be domesticated. The Rome Statute for the International Criminal Court of 1998, which came into force on 1st July 2002, was ratified by Nigeria on 27th September 2001, but it is yet to be domesticated. The UN Convention on the Prevention & Punishment of the Crime of Genocide ratified by Nigeria on 29th July 2009; is yet to be domesticated. Conventions, Treaties and Statutes are legally binding on State Parties such as Nigeria.
 
Other humanitarian agreements that are not in practice, municipally, in Nigeria are the UN Basic Principles on the Use of Force & Firearms by the Law Enforcement Officials (28th August-7th September 1990), the UN Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Personnel (17th December 1979), the UN Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners, the UN Basic Principles & Guidelines on the Right to a Remedy & Reparation for Victims of Gross Violation of International Humanitarian Law, and the UN Basic Principles & Guidelines on Development based Evictions & Displacement. These sets of rules and principles are morally binding on Nigeria.
 
In the area of human rights conventions and treaties, the all important International Covenant on Civil & Political Rights of 1966 (ICCPR), which Nigeria ratified on 29th October 1993, is yet to be domesticated. Its first and second Protocols (on the establishment of an individual complaint mechanism and abolition of death penalty respectively) are yet to be signed and ratified, not to talk of being domesticated. Another important international covenant called International Covenant on Economic, Social & Cultural Rights of 1966 (ICESCR) & its Protocol, which Nigeria ratified on 29th October 1993, is yet to be domesticated. Others are the Convention against Torture & other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT), ratified by Nigeria on 28th July 2001 as well as its Protocol ratified on 27th August 2009. They are yet to be domesticated.
 
There is also International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers & Members of their Families, ratified by Nigeria on 27th July 2009. It is yet to be domesticated. Another is International Convention on the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearances, ratified by Nigeria on 27th July 2009. It is yet to be domesticated. Yet another important treaty is the International Convention on the Rights of the Persons with Disabilities & its Protocol, ratified by Nigeria on 24th September 2010. They are yet to be domesticated. The International Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination(CERD), was ratified by Nigeria on 4th January 1969, but it is yet to be domesticated by the National Assembly; likewise the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and its Protocol, ratified by Nigeria on 13th June 1985 and 22nd November 2004 respectively. Till date, they have not been domesticated. To note also is the fact that 12 out of the 36 States of Nigeria have not domesticated the Convention on Right of the Child (CRC)of 1990.
 
ACJ Act Of 2015 As A Consolation To Nigerians: However, the only consolation to Nigerians from the outgoing Seventh National Assembly is the recent passage and presidential assent of the Administration of the Criminal Justice Act of the Federation 2015. This also appears to be the only Civil Society originated Private Member Bill; with the last being the Freedom of Information Act of 2011. With the amendment of the country’s archaic Evidence Act carried out in 2011, the legislative and presidential assent of the Administration of Criminal Justice Act is considered a major milestone by the stakeholders in the Criminal Justice Administration. The enacted Act seeks to repeal the Criminal Procedure Act, Cap C4 Law of Nigeria (2004) and the Administration of Justice Commission Act, Cap A3 Law of Nigeria (2004). Its aim is to abolish the dichotomy that presently exists between the Criminal Procedure Code (in operation in Northern Nigeria) and the Criminal Procedure Act (in operation in Southern Nigeria) by repealing both Acts.
 
The Act further seeks to establish a central criminal records registry with the Nigeria Police Force at its headquarters. The central criminal records registry system is established in Part 2, Section 16 of the Act to serve as a veritable database of all offenders in the country. The main foundation of the Act is to ensure speedy trial of accused criminal citizens and an end to judicial injustice using holding charge and detention without trial by the First into Criminal Justice System called the Nigeria Police Force (NPF).
 
Note: The concluding part of this Legislative Scorecard Appraisal of the outgoing Seventh Assembly of Nigeria & their States counterparts will be out in the next 24 or 48 hours.
 
Signed:
 
Emeka Umeagbalasi, B.Sc. (Hons) Criminology & Security Studies
Board Chairman, International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law
+2348174090052(office)
info@intersociety-ng.org, emekaumeagbalasi@yahoo.co.uk
 
Uzochukwu Oguejiofor, Esq., (LLB, BL), Head, Campaign & Publicity Department
 
Chiugo Onwuatuegwu, Esq., (LLB, BL), Head, Democracy & Good Governance Program
 
FOLLOW LINK BELOW TO READ Part 2 -
http://nigeriamasterweb.com/blog/index.php/2015/05/21/disastrous-performance-of-the-seventh-national-assembly-of-nigeria-challenges-before-the-eight-national-assembly-part-1
 
*Photo Caption - As seen

[ Masterweb Reports ] - The heart of the leadership of International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law is gladdened over the decision of the outgoing Seventh National Assembly of Nigeria to join the outgoing Government of Lagos State in heeding our recent calls for the account of stewardship of the outgoing executive and legislative arms of government in Nigeria including the Federal and State Executive Councils as well as the Federal and States Legislative Chambers. The call of ours under reference stems from the fact that whatever that has a beginning must have an end as well as the need to institutionalize at all times an enviable benchmark for public governance accountability in Nigeria. For records, the Nigeria’s National Assembly made up of the Senate called the Red Chambers with 109 Senators and the House of Representatives called the Green Chambers with 360 Honorable Members (Reps) is categorized as follows: First Republic National Assembly(1960-1966), Second Republic National Assembly (1979-1983), Third Republic National Assembly (1990-1991/2), Fourth Republic National Assembly (1999-2003), Fifth Republic National Assembly (2003-2007), Sixth Republic National Assembly (2007-2011), Seventh National Assembly (2011-2015) and Eight National Assembly (2015-2019). The Third Republic National Assembly (1990-1991/2) was a diarchic parliament put in place Gen Ibrahim Babangida’s military regime, which was......... Read More.
 
 
*Photo Caption - Nigeria National Assembly Complex

[ Masterweb Reports: Lawrence Chinedu Nwobu reports ] - In the United States, there is a strident campaign that reads “Black lives matter, ” these campaigns are reactions to the random and suspicious killing of Blacks by White Police Officers, the most recent being the slaying of Walter Scot execution style by Police Officer Micheal Slager in North Charleston, South Carolina. After videos emerged revealing the true circumstances of the brutal slaying of victim Walker Scot, the American public has been rightly enraged by the murderous act of the Police Officer who has since been arrested and charged. The shock from the cold blooded execution of Walter Scot and others before him has resulted in mass protests where the undervaluing of Black lives in America has been highlighted with the slogan “Black lives matter.”

 
But Blacks don’t live only in the United States, Blacks also live in Africa which happens to be their ancestral homes, but do Black lives matter in Africa? The crossing from Libya to Italy by desperate migrants from various Sub Saharan African countries including Nigeria in search for a better life is now most commonly called the journey of death and how true. Almost on a weekly basis hundreds of African migrants undertaking the perilous journey die in the course of the crossing. Even as hundreds and even thousands die hundreds more are embarking on the same hazardous trip, and this is on a daily basis. The International Organization for Migration (IOM) estimated that more than 3000 African migrants died in the course of crossing the Mediterranean in 2014. With the scale of deaths so far, 2015 is already racing to double or even triple the number of deaths recorded for 2014.



 
Yet, even as this apocalyptic scale of deaths by African migrants occurs before our television screens and news outlets, there is an eerie conspiracy of silence by African leaders. As hundreds are rescued, rotting corpses including those of children washed ashore and as European leaders are decrying the tragedy and holding summits on how to save lives and prevent the tragedies, African leaders are unconscionably mute. How could leaders whose people are facing such calamity be silent, while others are taking initiatives to save lives? How could African leaders have created conditions so bad in their countries that their citizens are desperate enough and willing to risk their lives to escape to foreign lands in hopes of finding a better life? Why is it that not a single African leader has expressed any remorse, regret or proffered any solution over the harvest of avoidable deaths in the Mediterranean?

 
The answer is simple; Black lives simply don’t matter as far as African leaders are concerned. The conspiracy of silence derives from that fundamental disregard for African lives. In the dictionary of the African leader, the commoners simply do not exist and government exists only to dispense patronage to the elites. This is why they created or sustained the inequalities, wars, injustice, deprivation, poverty, oppression, tribalism, marginalisation, insecurity, ethno-religious conflicts, misrule and corruption amongst others that forced out the migrants in the first place. The Mediterranean crisis has once again exposed African leaders for what they were always known to be. Africa never benefitted from much doubt as it concerns bad leadership and state failure on which the doctrine or idea of “Afro-pessimism” is premised. Those who dared against the obvious odds to argue or hope for a renascent Africa in the 21st century with good governance and caring servant leaders have seen their hopes dashed with the unfolding Mediterranean crisis.

 
It is even more tragic that as usual many Nigerian and African pundits have hypocritically added their voice to the campaign for the dignity of Black lives in the United States while Black lives don’t matter in our own climes. As the saying goes “charity begins at home” and it’s time for African leaders and all of us Africans to do some soul searching and begin to prioritise the dignity of life in our clime. Because in truth; the devaluing of Black lives in the United States and globally cannot be divorced from the devaluing of Black lives in our own climes. African leaders and Africans themselves have done more to devalue Black lives than anyone else. The ongoing Mediterranean crisis and the conspiracy of silence by African leaders is just another example of such phenomena.

 
Since the world is driven most often by perceptions and examples, we can’t expect to be treated very differently from how we treat ourselves. The world watches and sees how we do things and how we treat ourselves in Africa, which invariably becomes etched in popular culture and consciously or unconsciously reflects in how they see or treat us. We can only achieve the respect and equality we crave from others when we begin to give same to ourselves, if not the campaign on the dignity of Black lives can only go so far. Aluta continua!

 
Lawrence Chinedu Nwobu ( Email: lawrencenwobu@gmail.com ) reports.

 
*Photo Caption – Map of Africa

[ Masterweb Reports ] - Masterweb developed this page in a bid to daily keep you abreast of Nigerian and world news events so you are well informed and do not miss any news occurrence in Nigeria and around the globe. Most Nigerian newspapers are updated daily. Nigeria and World News Headlines are uptaded every ten minutes as events unfold in the world. 
 
This news page is a useful tool to both Nigerians and everybody irrespective of his or her nationality and country of residence in keeping abreast of current news around the world. We have millions of satisfied users of this page, some of who have made financial contributions in supporting the page and its component link sections.  
 
 
Use the links below to update yourself of today's news events - 
 
 
 
 
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=> Click To Read World Radio & TV News
 
*Photo Caption - As seen.

[ Masterweb Reports ] - Masterweb developed this page in a bid to daily keep you abreast of Nigerian and world news events so you are well informed and do not miss any news occurrence in Nigeria and around the globe. Most Nigerian newspapers are updated daily. Nigeria and World News Headlines are uptaded every ten minutes as events unfold in the world. 
 
This news page is a useful tool to both Nigerians and everybody irrespective of his or her nationality and country of residence in keeping abreast of current news around the world. We have millions of satisfied users of this page, some of who have made financial contributions in supporting the page and its component link sections.  
 
 
Use the links below to update yourself of today's news events - 
 
 
 
 
=> Click To Read Nigerian Newspapers
 
=> Click To Read Nigerian News Headlines
 
=> Click To Read World News Headlines
 
=> Click To Read Nigeria Radio & TV News
 
=> Click To Read World Radio & TV News
 
*Photo Caption - As seen.

[ Masterweb Reports: Dr. Peregrino Brimah reports ] - My engineer cousin had called my brother as he had similarly called me sometime after Buhari won the election. He had also told my brother why he was very interested in moving back home.
 
“We can generate electricity from trash,” my cousin had explained to my brother. “We can design cheap H20 generators…” he had said.
 
My brother, who like me is highly industrious – we all were the JET (Junior Engineers and Technicians) pioneers and representatives of our secondary schools back in the day – eagerly relayed the conversation to me. “What do you feel?” he asked, enthusiastically. “Don’t you see the prospects with the opportunity a new and fair government avails?”
 
 I pricked his bubble. “Our people will not buy. They will not use.”
 
I went further to explain:
 
Nigerians are locked in stagnation laced with unrelenting and unending, baseless hope. It is no accident we have been serially branded the most hopeful, “e go better,” people on the planet. Nigerians will sit in darkness for years, patiently waiting for the power, “light” to come, rather than purchasing a simple rechargeable fan-lamp, talk less an inverter(+/- solar) system.  They will wait for government water, rather than dig a well. Colonized!
 
I went on to cite several other examples including how my Kanuri friends from Borno, who I now regard as my brothers, resigned to me when I swore at them for being cowards-for not bearing arms and defending themselves against Boko Haram but rather watching as one-by-one their loved ones were killed by the cowards. “Yes we are cowards, worse than chickens,” one had admitted.
 
It’s the same reason they put thumb down for Jonathan. They know he stole tens of billions of dollars that would have changed their lives forever, but they are stuck in a state of pestilential consumptive obduration. They have gotten so comfortable believing that so it was, so it is and so it shall continue to be, that they are afraid of change, they even resist it. “Ordinary pencil Nigeria cannot make,” is more than a mantra, it is a prescription; a policy.
 
Do not make it. Do not fix it. Do not change it. This is Nigeria. Simply say, “e go better,” and move on. Who do you think you are? Leave it for the government to do. Don’t challenge it!
 
My brother felt quite disappointed. With a deep sigh, he retired to bed. It is true.
 
Dr. Peregrino Brimah ( Email: drbrimah@ends.ng ) reports.
 
*Photo Caption - Map & flag of Nigeria

[ Masterweb Reports ] - Masterweb developed this page in a bid to daily keep you abreast of Nigerian and world news events so you are well informed and do not miss any news occurrence in Nigeria and around the globe. Most Nigerian newspapers are updated daily. Nigeria and World News Headlines are uptaded every ten minutes as events unfold in the world. 
 
This news page is a useful tool to both Nigerians and everybody irrespective of his or her nationality and country of residence in keeping abreast of current news around the world. We have millions of satisfied users of this page, some of who have made financial contributions in supporting the page and its component link sections.  
 
 
Use the links below to update yourself of today's news events - 
 
 
 
 
=> Click To Read Nigerian Newspapers
 
=> Click To Read Nigerian News Headlines
 
=> Click To Read World News Headlines
 
=> Click To Read Nigeria Radio & TV News
 
=> Click To Read World Radio & TV News
 
*Photo Caption - As seen.