Translational inhibition due to CHEAP RETIN-A the fact that the path of the excitation occurs Br neuron. recurrent inhibition     Carried intercalary brake cells (Renshaw). Axons of buy nolvadex online canada motor neurons often give collaterals (branches), ending with Renshaw cells. Renshaw cell axons terminate on the body or dendrites of the motor neuron, forming inhibitory synapses. Arousal that occurs in motor neurons travel in a straight path to the skeletal muscle, as well as collaterals to inhibitory neurons, which send impulses to motoneurons and inhibits them. The stronger the motor neuron excitation, the more excited Renshaw cells and the more intense they exert their inhibitory effect, which protects nerve cells from overstimulation. lateral inhibition    
 

[ Masterweb Reports: Isiaka Wakili reports ] - President Muhammadu Buhari yesterday reiterated his opposition to the official devaluation of the nation’s currency, the naira, saying it would not yield any benefits to the nation. He was speaking at the New Banquet Hall of the Aso Rock Presidential Villa during a Ramadan dinner with the business community.

 

He said: “How much benefit have been derived from naira devaluation in the past?...Now, you need N300 or N350 to a dollar. What do we derive from that? How much benefit can we derive from this ruthless devaluation of the naira? I am not an economist, neither am I a businessman.
 

“I fail to appreciate the economic explanation. What has happened to us now is that we have manoeuvred ourselves into a mono economy which led to the collapse we are seeing now,” he added.
 

The president said a lot of responsibilities now fell on the shoulders of the business community with a lot of investments as well as a number of people they employed.

 
*Photo Caption - Naira notes

[ Press Release For Immediate Release ] - June 27, 2016: The Governor of Abia State, Dr Okezie Ikpeazu has called on Abians not to panic, but remain calm over the judgment of Justice Okon Abang of the Federal High Court Abuja delivered today in favor of Mr. Uche Oga against him, in the case of alleged falsification of tax receipts.

Governor Ikpeazu, who said that he has faith in the judiciary and rule of law, added that he will appeal the ruling as he has instructed his lawyers to file an appeal immediately against the said judgment.

The Governor noted as an appointee of the Abia State Government from 2011 to 2014, when he served as the General Manager, Abia State Passengers Integrated Manifest and Safety Scheme (ASPIMSS), and first Deputy General Manager, Abia State Environmental Protection Agency (ASEPA) Aba and Environs respectively, before his resignation in October 2014 to contest the Governorship election in the state, that within the period  his taxes were deducted at source, and when he had need of his tax clearance in 2014, he applied to the Abia State Board of Internal
Revenue, and was duly issued with his tax receipts for the period in question.

He maintained that he remains the Governor of the state according to law and will await the final determination of the matter by the appellate courts.

Enyinnaya Appolos
Chief Press Secretary (CPS) to the Governor
27/06/2016
 
 
*Photo Caption - Gov. Okezie Ikpeazu

[ Masterweb Reports: Olalekan Waheed Adigun reports ] -  Humans call God for different reasons. Some are purely altruistic while others are selfish. This explains why people like me tend to wonder whether my God is the same one others call. To some people, they see God essentially as a big, fat or old man (or woman) hence weak in need of whom to fight for Him. Others see God, as they know it as a Being that is somewhere and nowhere at the same time. They are just to “believe”, often without question(s). The questions about God are easy but made unnecessarily difficult by our very “religious” people.
 
Just recently in his contribution to the debate on the Osun school uniform controversy, Nobel laureate Professor Wole Soyinka, penned his: “To Everything, Its Place” on SaharaReporters. As simple as the thesis of the article reads, it appears some people still struggle to understand Kongi, even though he wrote that piece in everyday English!
 
Dr. Brimah, writing under the title: “It’s Not Too Late for Wole Soyinka to Repent”, in The Scoop in an obvious response to Soyinka’s earlier article appeared to be in a haste to write. If he had had a balanced reading (removing his so-religious lenses), he would have understood, even from the title: “To Everything, Its Place” that mixing religion with school system will only complicate, not simplify matters. Rather than see it that way, Brimah, in a deliberate misinterpretation of Kongi, told his readers that the Nobel laureate intends to “…separate God from the school.” The question I still ask myself since reading Dr. Brimah’s article is how Soyinka or any other person for that matter can “separate God from the school”?
 
Things became clearer to me as I read Dr. Brimah’s article further. He probably did his best to equate God with religion. In the article, he made mention of “anti-God” several times when referring to Soyinka’s religious beliefs. Kongi is a self-confessed Humanist (and a proud one at that), but millions of “religious” people like Brimah cannot make him “anti-God” because God Himself has no religion. Religion is only an institution created by men in other to understand or move closer to Godhead!
 
For Soyinka, the question of school uniform creates a sense of equality of some sorts among the pupils. He writes: “What that has meant is that children from affluent homes can attend school in designer clothing, forming associations distinguished by an elitist consciousness, in contrast to the farmers’ and workers’ children who can just about scrape together the odd pieces of castoff dressing from charity or second class clothing markets. A simplistic reading of the rights of children to individual self-expression is responsible for this takeover of the learning environment by fashion parades, a sight that is so prevalent in countries like the United States. My objection to this rests on the recognition that the modern school is an equivalent of the age-grade culture in traditional societies. There, the rites of passage from one phase of social existence to the next, are bound by rules that eliminate exhibitionism, and that includes a strict dress (or undress) code.” What is so difficult for anyone to understand in these simple sentences should confuse rational minds!
 
Like I wrote earlier that God Himself is not difficult to understand; only religious people make God seem difficult!
 
Rather than Dr. Brimah responding to this, he chose to the divert attention of unsuspecting readers. He wrote about the inevitability of classes in schools. He brought in a certain Sultan who was a wealthy child (in his school days); having toys he never had as a kid; and that all those never intimidated him as a kid, because Sultan gave him part of his possession when leaving the school. He writes: “Sultan… did not see his wealth as a tool of subjugation as wealthy adults do, but had us “poor” black brothers as his best pals, to play with all his toys with.” This does little in response to Soyinka’s argument since he accepts the inevitability of classes, but that the school system must not institutionalize it through the approved uniforms. Once there is uniformity among the students with the school uniforms, every other means of differentiating the students, either by physical sizes, intellectual abilities or skin colours must have nothing to do with the uniforms.
 
Let me be quick to add here that nowhere in the article did Soyinka created an “ideal” school system where pupils will suddenly become equal in all respect in their school uniforms except Dr. Brimah was responding to a different Soyinka’s article. Kongi only created a something of a “military barrack” situation where “comradeship, fraternity and esprit de corps” exist among students while on the school campuses. A situation where students are differentiated on the basis of their school uniforms in the same school only portends disorder. It paints a picture of indiscipline, lack of order and incoordination.
 
A situation where the young mind gets the impression that s/he is different from the other pupils by their mode of dressing; his/her own beliefs are different from those of other pupils through their school uniforms; s/he is reminded of his poor/affluent backgrounds in relation to his/her colleagues by the “quality” of materials or style of his/her own uniform; s/he is told about different his/her “values” are, not taught by the school system, but by other belief systems. All of these only complicate matters for our young people. Potentially, the school systems become centres for religious conflicts, rather than intellectual “battles”. It wouldn’t take a long time to start noticing supremacy battles between Sango/Obatala disciples; Zoroastrians/Buddhist; Christians Scientists/Pentecostals or Sunni/Shiites in our public schools.
 
The recent drama that erupted in the State of Osun over the interpretation of a Court judgment on the question of the wearing of hijabs in the State-owned public schools comes to mind. The state’s chapter of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN) in response directed Christian students wear their church robes to school should the school implement the court judgement. Even without doing a simple research on the matter, the online media when agog with the pictures of less than 10 students of the Baptist High School, Iwo in Church apparels. It was equally alleged that some CAN leaders in the state escorted the students in compliance with their “order”. They were there to monitor the reaction of the teachers to the strange mode of dressing of their children. My God! These are “Church robes” not school uniforms. Can we see how they differ? And then, why hijabs against the approved school uniforms?
 
Dramas or “proxy wars” like these would be largely avoided if the school uniforms reflect their names-“school uniforms” and not “Church robes” or “Mosques hijabs” or any other names they are called. Church robes or hijabs have their “place” in religious worship centres, not in schools.
 
The intentions of Dr. Brimah may be good, but resorting to the use of his own religious beliefs as a measure of what others believe or should believe is short in logic and long in ignorance. The fact that he resorted to existential questions in an attempt to justify is point attest to this. Christianity, Islam, Buddhism or Hinduism are not the only religions, there are several other believes, including Humanism or Atheism, which also lay claim to some Higher Powers or Self Existence or some sort that we call God. If everyone attends public schools in their different attires reflecting their beliefs what we will have in schools will just be colour riots or beauty pageants or religious festivals which are not the reasons for establishing the schools in the first instance. Things will be easier if intellectuals do their best to keep their religious views private (in their hearts) rather than complicate them by trying mixing religion with strictly secular issues like Dr. Brimah tried to do with his response. This is why, “To everything,” Kongi writes, has “Its place”.
 
Olalekan Waheed Adigun is a political risk analyst and independent political strategist for wide range of individuals, organisations and campaigns. He is based in Lagos, Nigeria. His write-ups can be viewed on his website http://olalekanadigun.com/ Tel: +2348136502040, +2347081901080
Email: olalekan@olalekanadigun.com, adgorwell@gmail.com

 
*Photo Caption - Nobel Laureate Prof. Wole Soyinka

[ Masterweb Reports ] - Masterweb developed this page in a bid to daily keep you abreast of Nigerian and world news events so you are well informed and do not miss any news occurrence in Nigeria and around the globe. Most Nigerian newspapers are updated daily. Nigeria and World News Headlines are uptaded every ten minutes as events unfold in the world. 
 
This news page is a useful tool to both Nigerians and everybody irrespective of his or her nationality and country of residence in keeping abreast of current news around the world. We have millions of satisfied users of this page, some of who have made financial contributions in supporting the page and its component link sections.  
 
Use the links below to update yourself of today's news events - 
 
=> Click To Read Nigerian Newspapers
 
=> Click To Read Nigerian News Headlines
 
=> Click To Read World News Headlines
 
=> Click To Read Nigeria Radio & TV News
 
=> Click To Read World Radio & TV News
 
To adequately keep abreast of Nigerian and world news events daily, below is a guide to follow so you do not miss any single news event in Nigeria and around the globe. This means that the news guide is important to both Nigerians and everybody irrespective of his or her nationality and country of residence.
 
STEPS TO FOLLOW NOT TO MISS ANY SINGLE NEWS ITEM
 
1. STEP ONE - Start-off by subscribing to Masterweb RSS News Feed - This is a one time action. Subscription to Masterweb RSS News Feed allows for the automatic download of our news updates to your computer - that way Masterweb news updates come to you automatically. Click here to subscribe to Masterweb RSS News Feed
 
_______
 
2. STEP TWO - Start the day by visiting our Newspapers Section ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/paperfrmes.html ) and read Nigerian and world news from different sources including Nigerian newspapers.
 
_______
 
3. STEP THREE - Visit both our Nigeria News Headlines ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/NigeriaNewsHeadlines.html/ ) and World News Headlines ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/WorldNewsHeadlines.html/ ) several times (up to 12 times) daily as the pages are updated every 45 minutes. During a visit, if the news is not updated, hit the F1 key on your keyboard to refresh the page for the latest news update.
 
_______
 
4. STEP FOUR - Check out what are on radio and TV in Nigeria and the world by visiting Nigeria Radio & TV News and World Radio & TV News
 
_______
 
5. STEP FIVE - Check out what our news contributors may have posted for the day at our Citizen News ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/blog/ ) and Masterweb Reports Section ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/Masterweb/ )
 
_______
 
6. STEP SIX - Revisit our Newspapers Section ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/paperfrmes.html ) before bedtime for late updates and/or following day's early updates by Masterweb and Nigerian newspapers.
 
_______
 
7. YOU ARE NOW FULLY INFORMED FOR THE DAY - If you follow the guide above, you will never miss any news event in the world. This means that you will be fully equipped to engage in any news or current affairs discussion anywhere and any place in the world. Best of luck!
 
8. ALL NEWS LINKS ABOVE ORGANIZED ON ONE PAGE - Masterweb has put together a unique page that has all the news links above that you need to adequately keep abreast of Nigerian and world news events - Click here to go to the page ( the Link or URL is http://www.nigeriamasterweb.com/NeverMissNewsEvents.html ).
 
*Photo Caption - As seen.

[ Masterweb Reports: Ade Adesomoju reports ] - A Federal High Court in Abuja has ordered the Governor of Abia State, Okezie Ikpeazu, to vacate office immediately for submitting false information to his party, the Peoples Democratic Party, for the party’s governorship primary in December 2014.
 
Justice Okon Abang in a judgment on Monday ordered the Independent National Electoral Commission to immediately issue a certificate of return to the plaintiff, Uche Ogah, who polled the second highest number of votes in the primary.
 
Details soon…
 
*Photo Caption - Governorb Okezie Ikpeazu

[ Masterweb Reports ] - 100 Nigerians who were selected for the Mandela Washignton Fellowiship, President Obama’s initiative to strengthen Young African Leaders, left Nigeria last week to the different top American universities where they are currently undergoing the Fellowship program. On Saturday, June 25, rumour of the death of one of the students flew around. The gossip was quelled by a letter from the Department of State and made available to Masterweb News Desk which read:  
 
 
Dear Mandela Washington Fellowship Host University partners,
 
 
It is with a very heavy heart that I write to you to let you know that earlier today, a Mandela Washington Fellow, Jean Paul Usman from Nigeria, has passed away after a tragic accident during a hike.  Jean Paul was studying civic leadership at Virginia Tech.
 
 
Jean Paul was a shining star who will be missed.  I know that your fellows will begin to hear the news and we wanted you to have some basic information at hand so that you can assist them to process this.  As there are 100 Nigerians in the program, it is very likely that many knew him or were friends with him.  For all of us, this is simply horrifying news and we are so very, very sorry.
 
 
The U.S. embassy has notified the family.  We, at both IREX and ECA, are available to assist you should you have any questions or concerns. I know this is extremely difficult for all of us.
 
 
Britta Bjornlund
Branch Chief, Mandela Washington Fellowship
Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
U.S. Department of State
_______________
 
Nkechi Udegboka, a fellow participant from Nigeria in the same program with Jean Paul in an interview with Masterweb said 24-year-old Paul was a vibrant young man. She said the deceased ( John Paul Usman - as she called him in the interview) hailed from Kogi State and was a final year student at  University of Ilorin, Kwara State. 
 
According to Udegboka, Usman led many initiatives which included: President of UNESCO Clubs; Coordinator for the Pan African Youth Network on the culture of Peace Nigeria, Ambassador for the Center for Ethics and Self-Value Orientation among others. He was also an award winning creative artist according to her.
 
In order to honour Usman, the 2016 Mandela Washington Fellows in various American universities have set aside Wednesday, June 29 for memorial service to be held in every institution at 7pm and dress code would be white.
 
*Photo Caption - Late Jean Paul (John Paul Usman) - Not sure of the discrepancy in name. Inscriptions by fellow program participants.

[ Masterweb Reports ] - 25 Mandela Washington Fellows of President Obama’s Initiative to strengthen African institutions through the Young African Leadership Initiative (YALI) were given a warm reception at the Northwestern University, Evanston, north of Chicago. Three Nigerians, Adams Adeiza, Tessie Nkechi Udegboka and Kelechi Mbah are among the young leaders from 18 African countries.
 
In her opening speech, Meg McDonald, the assistant vice president for Research at Northwestern University and who works on daily basis with the University Research Centers and Program of African Studies says she is privileged to formally welcome the 25 Fellows and thrilled they would be part of the University community over the course of the program.
 
She says, “Though the duration of the formal program is six weeks, but really our hope is that the experience you enjoy here will make a lifelong difference in your career and also a life changing experience. Our previous Mandela Washington Fellows – like each of you – were exceptionally talented and passionate leaders. They – like you – all demonstrated a vision for taking on challenges, solving problems, creating value, and improving their communities and their countries. Our goal this year is to create an extraordinary learning environment for you – one that you will always remember; and one that will help shape your personal and professional journey”.
 
Speaking on mutual investment, Meg says she and her colleagues regard the MWF as a wonderful way for Northwestern to invest in global talent development. Such action is at the heart of Northwestern University’s mission, so this President Obama’s initiative aligns well with Northwestern strategy and strength as a global research institution. She says, “We see the Mandela Washington Fellowship (MWF) program as an invitation for YOU to enrich OUR lives! Your presence here makes Northwestern a better place. Your ideas, your achievements, and your aspirations for creating business and social innovation enrich our academic community too. It is my pleasure to welcome you as members of the Northwestern University family.
 
What can I say about your new family? Some key statistics can help outline our excellence. Northwestern University was founded in 1851, with two faculty and 10 students. We have grown to more than 3,000 faculty with 8,000 undergraduate and 12,000 graduate students in 12 schools on three major campuses – Evanston, Chicago and Qatar.
 
The knowledge Northwestern University is creating and sharing is having a huge beneficial impact for the world. Our research discoveries are diverse ranging from breakthroughs in nanotechnology and biomedicine to astrophysics, energy, the humanities, social sciences and public policy. Our 50 University Research Centers are a major part of this knowledge ecosystem. These centers are innovation hubs that bring together thought leaders from many different disciplines and from around the world. Northwestern is ranked 12th in `America’s Best Universities and 25th in the Times Higher Education World University survey".
 
Already the 25 young leaders have started having amazing warmth professional and caring experience with Professors Verinder Syal and Mike Marasco, the faculty leaders. She says to the 25 Fellows, “During the program, you will meet and work with many amazing people from social service agencies, government and industries. For example, you are scheduled to meet with Jan Schakowsky, our local congresswoman. Jan started her career in social services, and was first elected to the US House of representatives in 1990. Jan is a stellar example of how person can make a huge and positive difference.
 
And, of course you even get to meet President Obama when you go to Washington DC. The culmination of this program in Washington demonstrates the importance placed on it at the very highest levels of this nation.
 
It’s pretty difficult to get into Northwestern University: we only accept 13% of the students applying for admittance. Our graduates have excelled in many different professions. Some have won Oscars, Pulitzers, Olympic medals, and Nobel prizes. Several have held high government offices, or served on the US Supreme Court. They have been senior leaders of prestigious academic and medical institutions.
 
Our graduates also have led major corporations, including PepsiCo, Motorola, and IBM. A Northwestern grad is the current CEO of SpaceX. A recent alum launched Groupon; another founded and leads the One Acre Fund in East Africa. You will truly enjoy meeting Harry Kraemer, the former CEO of Baxter and a fellow alum of the Kellog School of Management.
 
 But now, consider the MWF Program, which has an acceptance rate of less than 2%. Remember I just said Northwestern’s acceptance rate is 13%. Think about that for a moment. ……… So you are the chosen of the chosen, the best of the best. You are poised to make an enormously positive impact on the world”
 
She quoted President Obama, who in 2015 while addressing the Mandela Fellows said, “I have no doubt that you are going to leave behind for the next generation – and the generation after that – an Africa that is strong and vibrant and prosperous, and is ascendant on the world stage. “
 
Expressing her gratitude to host the Fellows, Mag says, “I’m so very pleased that Northwestern is part of your remarkable personal journey, and always remember that you are now part of the Northwestern family.”
 
The 3 Nigerians were excited to find a Nigerian lecturer from Anambra state at the university, Professor Jide Nzelibe, a professor of Law, who him and his wife both lecture at the university.
 
*Photo Caption - Participants in the program - Kelechi Mbah (left); Adams Adeiza (center) and Tessie Nkechi Udegboka (right) pose for photo.
 



[ Masterweb Reports: Abdullahi Tasiu Abubakar reports ] - Currently a Romanian school drop-out has more chances of getting a job in the UK than a Nigerian PhD holder. Skilled Nigerians could gain a lot under the proposed system. David Cameron’s fantastically foolish decision to hold a referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union has cost him his job, shaken the opposition Labour Party and sent shockwaves across the world. Nigeria is not immune.
 

The UK prime minister had wanted to use the referendum to shut up the Eurosceptics within and outside his Conservative Party. Instead he is now likely to hand over the party and the country to them. As one commentator, John Crace, says, “He’d gambled the future of the country for an internal party squabble and he’d lost.”
 
But while Mr Cameron licks his well-deserved wounds, the world would have to deal with the mess he created. The huge tumbles in global stock markets seen last Friday may be just the beginning. The worst case scenario would be a 2008-like global financial crisis and its subsequent recession. If that happens, Nigeria would be in turmoil because unlike the 2008 crisis, which it withstood because she was awash with petrodollars then, this time around her economy is in a shambles. A further disruption could mean economic collapse, Boko Haram’s resurgence, Niger Delta Avenger’s anarchy and Biafra separatists’ chaos…
 

But hold your breath, this scenario is actually avoidable. First, Brexit needs not to lead to global economic crisis. Financial institutions are more regulated now, banks more capitalised and the system more equipped to deal with the situation. Second, the hysteria that first greeted the exit vote, with some EU officials asking Britain to quickly go, is now being replaced by more measured reactions. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said nasty divorce would help no one. United States Secretary of State John Kerry is also mediating to avert unnecessary dispute. So it is not all doom and gloom.
 

In fact, handled cleverly, the UK’s decision to leave EU would be beneficial to many countries, including Nigeria.
 

First, a Britain that is committed to doing trade with non-EU countries and freed from the restrictive EU trading codes will natural turn to its traditional trading partners, such as Nigeria, for greater business opportunities. This would be mutually beneficial for the two countries.
 

Secondly, the main weapon Brexit campaigners used to persuade people to vote for exit was the uncontrolled EU migration to Britain. Former London Mayor Boris Johnson and Justice Secretary Michael Gove, who led the campaign, argue persuasively that Britain will benefit more if it adopts an Australian-type points-based non-discriminatory migration system which gives equal opportunities to both EU and non-EU citizens to work in the UK.  Under this system, Nigerians, having English as their second language, will have more chances of getting UK work permit visas than say Romanians.  Currently a Romanian school drop-out has more chances of getting a job in the UK than a Nigerian PhD holder. Skilled Nigerians could gain a lot under the proposed system. Of course, there is a negative side of this, in the form of possible brain drain against Nigeria. But there would be good remittances from those Nigerians. So what Nigeria may miss in their services at home, it will gain in the hard currency they would be sending home, which is highly needed now.
 

Thirdly, student visa is another area where Nigerians are bound to gain from Brexit. It is becoming increasingly difficult for prospective Nigerian students to get visa to study in the UK mainly due to British government’s desperation to meet immigration targets in the face of mounting EU migrant figures. Since the UK, under the existing system, cannot control EU migration, David Cameron’s administration decided to put several visa restrictions for non-EU citizens to achieve his pledge of reducing immigration figures to “tens of thousands a year, not hundreds of thousands”. And as he fails to meet the target year after year, his government keeps adding new restrictions and making it more difficult for non-EU students to have opportunities to study in the UK.
 

Worse still, as part of that restriction scheme, the government abolished a post study visa programme, which grants two-year permit for students to work in Britain after their studies. It was a very effective system which didn’t only help the UK economy to get the services of the skilled manpower, but also enabled the graduates to gain valuable work experience and recoup the money they invested for their study before returning to their countries. The new system being proposed by Brexiteers looks set to restore this programme. Many Nigerians would gain from it. Of course, British universities, too, would earn more money and greater cultural capital from a more liberal student visa system.
 

Another area of potential benefits for Nigerians is the predicted fall in UK house prices as the result of quitting the EU. If this happens, many Nigerians residing in the UK including students who collect huge money from their parents for rents will get some relief. But, of course, wealthy Nigerians who own mansions in Central London may be among the losers, too. And those who stole Nigerians’ money and stashed it there would equally see the value of their ill-gotten wealth lose its value.
 

Away from the economy, Brexit could have other consequences on Nigerians, some of them negative. There is fear, for instance, that Brexit campaigns which were partly pursued on highlighting the dangers of immigration would heighten xenophobia and put Nigerians residing in the UK in trouble.  While this could be a possibility, it is unlikely to be as serious as being feared. Nigel Farage, the leader of the United Kingdom Independent Party (UKIP) who is accused of promoting anti-migrants narratives, is not going to govern post-Cameron Britain. And his supporters aren’t going to be in charge of the UK streets. He and his supporters did play a role in winning the referendum, but they are marginal in the main structure of British establishment. And frankly, Britain is overwhelmingly a tolerant society; Brexit won’t change this.
 

But the wind of separatism that seems to blow along with Brexit is also being seen as a potential negative impact on Nigeria. The separatist revival coming from the Scottish nationalists who were angered by the ‘Vote to Leave’ may embolden Nigerian separatists to step up their own campaigns. The Niger Delta Avengers have already capitalised on Brexit to make this point. In a tweet they sent yesterday they asked President Muhammadu Buhari to do “just like what David Cameron of Great Britain did” and allow for a separation referendum in Nigeria. But given that Cameron himself is already regretting his action, no one would want to emulate him.

 
*Photo Caption - As seen.

[ Masterweb Reports ] - Masterweb developed this page in a bid to daily keep you abreast of Nigerian and world news events so you are well informed and do not miss any news occurrence in Nigeria and around the globe. Most Nigerian newspapers are updated daily. Nigeria and World News Headlines are uptaded every ten minutes as events unfold in the world. 
 
This news page is a useful tool to both Nigerians and everybody irrespective of his or her nationality and country of residence in keeping abreast of current news around the world. We have millions of satisfied users of this page, some of who have made financial contributions in supporting the page and its component link sections.  
 
Use the links below to update yourself of today's news events - 
 
=> Click To Read Nigerian Newspapers
 
=> Click To Read Nigerian News Headlines
 
=> Click To Read World News Headlines
 
=> Click To Read Nigeria Radio & TV News
 
=> Click To Read World Radio & TV News
 
To adequately keep abreast of Nigerian and world news events daily, below is a guide to follow so you do not miss any single news event in Nigeria and around the globe. This means that the news guide is important to both Nigerians and everybody irrespective of his or her nationality and country of residence.
 
STEPS TO FOLLOW NOT TO MISS ANY SINGLE NEWS ITEM
 
1. STEP ONE - Start-off by subscribing to Masterweb RSS News Feed - This is a one time action. Subscription to Masterweb RSS News Feed allows for the automatic download of our news updates to your computer - that way Masterweb news updates come to you automatically. Click here to subscribe to Masterweb RSS News Feed
 
_______
 
2. STEP TWO - Start the day by visiting our Newspapers Section ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/paperfrmes.html ) and read Nigerian and world news from different sources including Nigerian newspapers.
 
_______
 
3. STEP THREE - Visit both our Nigeria News Headlines ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/NigeriaNewsHeadlines.html/ ) and World News Headlines ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/WorldNewsHeadlines.html/ ) several times (up to 12 times) daily as the pages are updated every 45 minutes. During a visit, if the news is not updated, hit the F1 key on your keyboard to refresh the page for the latest news update.
 
_______
 
4. STEP FOUR - Check out what are on radio and TV in Nigeria and the world by visiting Nigeria Radio & TV News and World Radio & TV News
 
_______
 
5. STEP FIVE - Check out what our news contributors may have posted for the day at our Citizen News ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/blog/ ) and Masterweb Reports Section ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/Masterweb/ )
 
_______
 
6. STEP SIX - Revisit our Newspapers Section ( www.nigeriamasterweb.com/paperfrmes.html ) before bedtime for late updates and/or following day's early updates by Masterweb and Nigerian newspapers.
 
_______
 
7. YOU ARE NOW FULLY INFORMED FOR THE DAY - If you follow the guide above, you will never miss any news event in the world. This means that you will be fully equipped to engage in any news or current affairs discussion anywhere and any place in the world. Best of luck!
 
8. ALL NEWS LINKS ABOVE ORGANIZED ON ONE PAGE - Masterweb has put together a unique page that has all the news links above that you need to adequately keep abreast of Nigerian and world news events - Click here to go to the page ( the Link or URL is http://www.nigeriamasterweb.com/NeverMissNewsEvents.html ).
 
*Photo Caption - As seen.

[ Masterweb Reports: Dr. Peregrino Brimah reports ] - For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? Mark 8:36 (KJV). It baffles when one reads from worldly intellectuals who seem unable to comprehend and appreciate things as simple, plain and obvious as God. It becomes hard to reconcile how their 'high' intellect can yet be so lacking in what to us is perhaps the most basic properties of existence and the very reason behind it. It's like being able to program a computer but unable to add 1 to 1. 
 
The latest piece by Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka, titled "To Everything, Its Place" as it appeared in SaharaReporters, was one more piece by the unbelieving, globally renowned fanatically anti-God professor that scratched the mind. In a nutshell, the professor was trying to separate God from the school.
 
Professor Soyinka believes as he expressed, as appreciated by me, that mixing God and Holiness with children's academic life causes "religious clashes of increasing savagery." Once again, the professor casually linked religiousness and God-consciousness with Boko Haram as the symbol and in a way, only terror he knows of. He would prefer that things like veils that make a student "show off" as being "holier" are discarded along with shows of wealth in student dressing. The professor casually described the use of British colonial school uniforms as consecrated and sacrosanct, defending this "doctrine" on the basis of a lack of national debate on its retained significance "after several decades of independence."
 
The Ununiform Uniform
 
Most schools in the United States and perhaps most schools in most countries in the world do not use school uniforms. In Europe, Britain and Ireland are the only countries where the school uniform is widely adopted by state schools and generally supported by the government. One wonders how small Soyinka's world is that he thinks school uniforms are standard, or perhaps, how much he attempts to contract the world to pursue his arguments.
 
The attempt to define student learning as a process not to be interfered with by wealth or morality, falls flat on its face when one studies the American academic system where children wear their fancy clothes to school if they can afford it and those who believe in veils cover their hair as recommended in the Bible and Quran, if and as they deem fit. Does a peer wearing designer clothes frustrate a fellow student and destroy him? Does a classmate wearing a veil feel she is demonstrating a "holier than thou" attitude and does this frustrate her peers? Where did professor Soyinka get these ideas from? It's certainly been long but has he completely forgotten his childhood schooling experience?
 
I went to school in my kid years in Geneva Switzerland. My "primary" school, La Chataigneraie international school like most others did not prescribe the "holy" uniforms and did not discriminate wealth or holiness. We had a very wealthy friend called Sultan. We used to call him Salt and pepper. As you may imagine, Sultan was the filthy rich kid of a Sultan. While his wealth of games and toys that I could only dream of, was clearly appealing to me at my tender age, I was not oppressed by it. Sultan also did not see his wealth as a tool of subjugation as wealthy adults do, but had us "poor" black brothers as his best pals, to play with all his toys with. He even gave us many to take away when my brother and I left the school. 
 
If there is a time that human beings can and should be tested and taught what diversity is, is it not at a tender age? Or would the professor rather promote a fake uniformed world where all realities are snuffed so when the children suddenly graduate and go to university as happened with Boko Haram founders, and witness the disparity, oppression and inequality, they revolt and establish terror groups on the basis of "fighting inequality and government corruption that breeds it" as was Boko Haram's foundational sell pitch? What does the professor know of attribution, correlation and association and on what basis does he draw up and select his explanations for Boko Haram (the only terror he appears to know).
 
As children, seeing fancy toys we could not own, we turned into master inventors and creators. We made our toys. We built and built and by the time I was in a secondary school in Nigeria, I was a chief inventor. Together with a secondary school best friend who today is Nigeria's top drone expert and was involved in the Gulma drone the Jonathan government built, my humble self led our school to Junior Engineers and Technicians victories. I would say there was an advantage to seeing things I could not own, that challenged me as a pupil. I believe certain challenges I faced in that international school in Switzerland moulded me into a human right advocate I am today.
 
Bring the wealth, bring the holiness, bring the high IQs and let us also bring our poverty, skin complexion, lower IQs and other social and physical qualities and inequalities and let a proper school with sensible teachers marinate all that into a good soup. And even if wealth is to be checked at the school's door; does a school not teach morality and holiness?
 
If as the professor loves to repeat, the errors of takfiri Muslims which he believes is in the very essence of Islam as a whole, led to the development of Boko Haram, what causes Ombatse, MEND, Niger Delta Avengers, armed robbers, government officials, and all other terror-associated formations? The lack of Islam? The lack of the veil? Does the professor not see his arguments as too simplistic?
 
As Professor Soyinka advances in age I wonder if he is able to answer the question all anti-Godists have yet been unable to: what is the purpose of his existence? Why do those kids need to go to school in the first place? To learn, earn, breed and die...like animals? To continue to propagate the human species for the sake of propagating the human species? To have fun without fear, to love life and fear death? To wear uniform and be uniform, or not to? To Ben Stein's amusement, a foremost anti-God faithful fanatic prophet, Richard Dawkins said Aliens put us here. Perhaps life's purpose is to serve the aliens? 
 
Why a place for everything?
 
Dr. Peregrino Brimah ( Email: drbrimah@gmail.com ) reports.
 
*Photo Caption - Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka