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03/13/14

*Southeast CSO Delegation To The National Confab: Putting The Records Straight

By Intersociety

CSO Delegation To National Confab & The Issue Of Southeast Representation: Putting The Records Straight

(Onitsha Nigeria, 3rd day of March, 2014)-The events of past weeks as they concern which CSO leaders will represent the Southeast geopolitical zone at the proposed National Conference have continued to generate varying interests and confusions, warranting submissions of different list of delegates to the office of the Secretary to the Government of the Federation (SGF). For records, Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) are globally understood to be social groups that are not classified as “governmental and business enterprises”. In USA, they are called “non-profits/not-for-profits”, which include churches, community based organizations, youth organizations and career associations. But in Nigeria, CSOs are generally seen, especially by policy makers/ government operators as “groups advocating for and promoting democracy, good governance and human rights”.

This explains why the 24 slots allocated to Nigerian CSOs for the proposed confab on the basis of four slots per geopolitical zone, are generally seen as “slots for pro-democracy, good governance and human rights community”. It is very important to point out that the Federal Government of Nigeria has the final say on which CSO leader should be on the final list to be made public soonest. The differing interests and confusions over the CSO list of delegates started about two months ago, when some CSO leaders domiciled in Lagos and Abuja, met in Abuja and produced a list containing 24 CSO leaders and caused it to be forwarded to the office of the SGF as “list of CSO leaders” meant for the confab (see Daily Trust of 28/02/2014). As expected, no CSO leadership operating and domiciling in the Southeast geopolitical zone was put in the know.

According to Mr. Ezenwa Nwagwu and Jaye Gaskia, who convened the Abuja meeting, those nominated are “Auwal Musa Rafsanjani, Chima Amadi, Chido Onumah, Isaac Osuoka, Ezenwa Nwagwu, Samson Itodo, Ayelebola Babatunde, Faith Nwadishi, Nnimmo Bassey, Ayo Obe, Jaye Gaskia, Olarenwaju Suraj, Uju Agomuo, Steve Aluko, Olisa Agbakoba, Nasser Kura, Y.Z. Yau, Dudu Paloma, Ngozi Obiorah, Abiola Akiode, Tor Yorapu, Ms. Ene Ede, Ms. Idayat Hassan and Jibo Ibrahim. The list of delegates produced by the above group is tagged: “preferred list”. Funny enough, none of the names contained therein, supposedly meant for the Southeast zone, is known to reside and operate in the zone. Out of 365 days in a year, none of them spends 30 days in all in the zone. Some, if not many of them do not know how many LGA or autonomous communities that exist in their States of birth, not to talk of speaking Igbo language fluently; yet they want to represent their zone of birth or ancestry at the National Confab.

Sensing possible hijack of the CSO slots, particularly the four slots meant for the Southeast geopolitical zone, a coalition of rights and pro-democracy groups working and domiciling in the Zone met in Enugu on 7th of February, 2014 and deliberated on the issue and resolved to elect four delegates from the zone to the confab with a strong message that those that will fill the four CSO slots for the zone must be operating and residing in the Southeast zone. Four rights and pro-democracy activists with track records of activities in the zone, who also reside in the zone, were elected. They are: Zulu Offolue for Abia State. He holds two master’s degrees in philosophy (edu.) and economics and chairs CLO, Enugu State Branch. He is also the current Secretary General of the United Action for Democracy in Nigeria.

Emeka Umeagbalasi for Anambra State. He holds bachelor’s degree in Criminology & Security Studies and served variously as chairman and vice chairman of CLO, Anambra State and Southeast zone. He is an alumnus of the US State Department’s International Visitors’ Leadership Program (class of June 2013). He founded and chairs International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law-Intersociety(see www.intersociety-ng.org for more details of his rights based activities). Eze Eluchie for Imo State. He holds master’s degree in law and has worked in various rights areas both in Nigeria and in overseas for years. He chairs PADDI Foundation. Jerry Chukwuokoro for Enugu State. He holds doctor of philosophy in philosophy and teaches at Ebonyi State University. He is the Sectary of the Campaign for Democracy in the Southeast zone and a prominent member of CLO, Enugu State Branch.

Yet, on 15th day of February, 2014, another meeting was convened in Enugu by some Lagos and Abuja based CSO activists, under the auspices of “Eastern Human Rights & Pro-Democracy Activists” (CEHRAPA). Those the Abuja/Lagos based activists picked as confab delegates are the following: 1. Olisa Agbakoba (Lagos based) for Anambra State. 2. Eze Onyekpere (Lagos/Abuja based) for Imo State. 3. Uju Agumuo (Lagos/Abuja based) for Abia State. And 4. Ibuchukwu Ezike (Lagos based) for Enugu State. The list and names selected by the conveners of the said meeting were tagged “our first eleven”.

While we hold nothing against their persons and achievements some of them recorded especially during the military era, we see these two events in Abuja and Enugu as not only undemocratic, but they also fall short of equity and fairness. Some of them are big enough to be included in their professional bodies, State and Federal Governments’ slots; thereby allowing rooms for younger activists, especially those who reside and operate in the Southeast geopolitical zone to participate. The position recently taken by the duo of Professor Ben Nwabueze and Dr. Alex Ekwueme not to participate in the proposed National Confab in order to give rooms for younger Igbo-Nigerians to participate, is a clear case in point and roundly commendable. He or she that goes to equity must go with clean hands! CSO leaders in Nigeria lack moral latitude to condemn Federal Government for not democratizing selection process for the proposed National Conference because their own selection process is worse than that of Federal Government.

It is also important to point out that voices of CSOs’ leaders in Nigeria have remained irreconcilably incoherent since the return to civil rule in 1999. During the military era, their voices were largely one, but nowadays, such voices are patently divided along “agenda”, “progressive”, “retrogressive” and “tribal/sectional” lines. It is a truism that a good number of CSO leaders in Nigeria come from Southeast geopolitical zone by birth. But it is also a truism that the zone is the least beneficiary of their activities and the major beneficiary of their activities is the Southwest geopolitical zone. The dominant CSO agenda in Nigeria today, which is tagged “progressive agenda”, is oiled by socio-political policies of the Southwest zone. Yet, when it comes to important issues like national confab that requires nomination or delegation, the policy makers/government operators hosting these diasporan activists and benefiting from their activities, swiftly turn their back against them and reward their natives. It is in response to these that these “brother/sister” activists rush back to their zone of birth with a view to hijacking the slots meant for the zone.

Sometimes, these returnee activists resort to intimidation of their “sedentary” counterparts by reminding them they started activism from the era of Adam and Eve. At other times, they will resort to name calling and campaign of calumny, which include calling them “quarks”, “clowns”, “charlatans”, “illiterates”, “semi-illiterates”, “government apologists”, etc. But if a field survey is carried out, the so called “second class” activists will be found to have performed unparalleled. Funny enough, many of these so called “second class” activists have more educational qualifications and field experiences than the so called “first class” activists. The danger of allowing, some say “pastoralist” activists to represent the Southeast zone in an important national confab such as the one being proposed is far reaching. Apart from not being in tune with social realities in the zone, they can easily be reached by their host zone or zone of their residency. It is also on record that the returnee CSO leaders under reference are more close to their residential governments than those in the Southeast zone. In States like Lagos, there is “CSO Liaison”.

Above all, a national confab is not an elitist activity. It is like writing a constitution, which must be done in simplest language because it serves every Tom, Dick and Harry. The Kenyan Constitutional Conference of 2010 is a case in point because it offered room of participation for both professors, carpenters, “qunu” makers and other members of the downtrodden. Elitism has no place in human rights and pro-democracy movement. In the world over, the champions of rights and pro-democracy movements are well known members of the downtrodden. Educational and field capacity building skills earned through scholarships offered by foundations and other funding institutions, are not meant to be bragged about by their beneficiary activists, but to reposition rights and pro-democracy leaders to do more to alleviate the sufferings of the downtrodden including making them know their rights and social obligations. Human rights and pro-democracy movements must no longer be seen or treated as “People’s Club of Nigeria” or “Professorial Deanship of a University”.

We, therefore, call on Federal Government and core stakeholders in various States of the Federation including political office holders to be mindful of those picked to represent their zones and collective interests to avoid corrupting and compromising the future well beings of their regions or zones.

Signed:

For: International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law

Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman of the Board
Phone: +234(0)8033601078, 8180103912
Email: emekaumeagbalasi@yahoo.co.uk, botchairman@intersociety-ng.org

Comrade Justus Uche Ijeoma, Head, Publicity Desk
Phone: +234(0)8037114869
Email: juijeoma@yahoo.com

Emeka Umeagbalasi

Photo Above: Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman, Board of Trustees, Intersociety, 41, Miss Elems Street, Fegge, Onitsha, Anambra State, Nigeria.
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03/11/14

*Governor T. A. Orji Sure-P Team & MTN Photo News

From Abia State

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Photo Above: Gov. Theodore Orji of Abia state in a warm handshake with Chief Emeka Wogu, Minister for Labour and Productivity, when led a delegation of Sure-P team to Abia state on a sensitization tour in Umuahia.

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Photo Above: L-R Chief Emeka Wogu, Minister for Labour and Productivity, Gov. Theodore Orji of Abia state, his deputy Sir Emeka Ananaba and Rt. Hon. Udeh Okochukwu, Speaker, Abia state house of Assembly in a group photograph during a courtesy visit by the minister and Sure-P team to the governor in Umuahia.

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Photo Above: Dr. Okechukwu Ogah, Commissioner for health, Mr. Danis Okoro, Director MTN Foundation, Gov. Theodore Orji of Abia state and Rt. Hon. Udeh Okochukwu, Speaker, Abia State House of Assembly at the official launching and flag-off of the Abia State-MTN Y'ello Doctor mobile intervention scheme in Umuahia.

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*Two Is Fighting: Nigeria’s Hausa and Igbo

Dr. Peregrino Brimah

‘Two is fighting’ is a common Nigerian expression that fits the hard to deny and ignore fact that a significant proportion of Nigeria’s Hausa’s and Igbo’s on the online community are fighting. A history of strife has undoubtedly existed among members of these two large ethnic groups in the country. What also is apparent is that not really much has been and is being done to resolve this apparently intractable crisis that potentially strains Nigeria’s hope for progress. Perhaps those of us who are not direct partakers are not bothered, feel there is nothing we can do or are benefactors of the tension.

Nigeria has a buoyant youth population. 45% of Nigerians are below 14 years. 35% of the population of the nation are between the ages of 15 and 35. Combined, this represents about 80% of Nigerians who can be considered youth, below 35 years. What this also means is that most Nigerians today are 80s and up babies. Born way after much of the tensions between these two groups first started, and only inheritors of the relayed ‘traditions’ that created and sustain these tensions.

For those unfamiliar with the problem being discussed; once a look is taken at commentaries on Nigerian blogs or websites, immediately the observer recognizes significant segregation, affinities and revulsions, leading up to stark insults and threats. ( Continues below..... )

Nigeria six geopolitical zones

Photo Above: Nigeria six geopolitical zones

You read Hausa handles call Igbo’s ‘baby factory products,’ ‘wife-killers,’ ‘armed robbers,’ ‘traitors,’ and the like and on the other side, you read Igbo-sounding handles labeling Hausa-like names, ‘Fulani cattle rearers,’ ‘Boko Haram,’ ‘terrorists, ‘ ‘Almajiri’s,’ ‘illiterates,’ and ‘the usurpers and problem of Nigeria.’

You cannot avoid the hostilities online. They are loud and appear to increase in pitch daily. Ethnic tensions have been at a highest in years under the current Nigerian political dispensation. Undeniably, addressing issues of corruption is obstructed due to this accidental or purposeful prevalence of ethnic suspicion and frank tribalism. In a recent case of grand corruption, the former minister of Aviation, Stella Oduah case, it was clear that Igbo’s especially defended her of her exposed crimes. In the case of whistleblower, Sanusi Lamido Sanusi of the Central Bank, who was accused of his own mismanagement at the Central bank, it also appears that a significant amount of the support he got was particularly among the Hausa’s. Can a nation move forward with this type of distraction?

Though the differences between these two cases is obvious. One, the Aviation minister, was caught by the media, stealing with hand in pot and was embraced by the government for as long as they could; while the other blew a whistle of billions of dollars being stolen by the government and was immediately fired and had his passport seized, the public reaction to both cases was clearly tinted with ethnic markers. Some people who refuse as yet to strongly clamor for the recovery of Nigeria’s missing billions as exposed by the former CBN governor, were quick to ask for his head and to react to the allegations against this ‘Hausa/Fulani’ man, while others who were loud in accusation against Stella caught stealing, have been less vocal in supporting clear investigation of Sanusi so long as this does not distract from and obscure the full audit and recovery of Nigeria’s missing billions of dollars he exposed. Similar postures are noticed in the Jonathan Government honoring of Abacha an unquestionable thief.

Opinions are allowed and healthy. Personally for instance, I support positive reconciliation for Nigeria’s thieves. Blow a whistle, expose a bigger thief and we can decide to pardon you completely or grant you exile-pardon. But I must not impose my opinion on others and use my opinion to obscure justice. Nigerians must strive to come together with positive analysis, honest condemnation and a quest for true justice, else, we the poor 112 million will continue to suffer at the mercy of a handful of wicked, united cabal.

History of Tensions

It is noted that the alleged tensions between these two groups especially developed long before most of those active online were born and many do not know or care to know the history of the tensions. Many agree that the Igbo have been significantly sidelined in Nigeria’s governance history. This is noted to have followed the Biafra 1967 threat of secession; a type of punishment and distrust. What is also true is that the Hausa’s are the poorest of Nigerian’s despite being accused of having held on to power the longest. But the truth of the matter is far from much of what has triggered and sustained the tensions most prominent between these two groups.

The amalgamation of Nigeria in 1914 undoubtedly laid an environment for possible crisis, but amalgamations of this nature do not always lead to crisis. There are similar amalgamations of identically heterogeneous peoples across Africa, as close as neighboring Ghana and Cameroon which also have northern Hausa speaking populations, which do not bear the Nigerian typical conflict hallmarks. Many historians agree that the British purposefully sowed seeds of tension between the two groups.

The history is long and deep. There is much that happened, political appointments, army predominance’s and other historical stuff. There are also significant events that triggered episodes of beef especially among the political and military elite class. There is the 1966 Kaduna Nzeogwu coup and assassination of northern top elite, which was the first post-colonial episode of serious aggravation and has been viewed by some as a major trigger that provoked Hausa-Igbo sentiments. There are the rampant episodes of pogroms particularly targeted at the Igbo community in the north in which thousands were killed by rampaging northern youth.

But the truth of the matter is, as much as much of the past holds episodes of pain, distrust and betrayal, many of us youth have no choice but to move ahead and put the bitter parts of our past that we possibly have skewed details of behind us. Today in the media we see so much lies and misrepresentations of events of the day, talk less during those days of paper and verbal media. How many lies have we been told? How long will Nigeria’s youth continue to hold grouse for things they probably have adulterated stories of?

Take for instance the bane of this article. Hausa- Igbo. That in itself holds so much lies it is ridiculous. Who are the Hausa and who are the Igbo?

Growing up, many of us literally believed Nigeria had only three ethnic groups. Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba. These were the days of WaZoBia. For some, it was reading history of the Biafra war when the Ijaw walked out on the Igbo that made them realize the South was not all Igbo, but had Ijaw in it. For some, it was only when the current President, Goodluck Ebele Jonathan was elected President and many Igbo still claimed they had not yet really held the top seat that they recognized Ijaw as different from Igbo.

Let’s take a look at the Hausa too. Many do not know that the difference between the Hausa and Fulani is just like the difference between the Igbo and Ijaw. Saying, Hausa/Fulani is like saying, Igbo/Ijaw.

A good deal of young Nigerians do not know that the Hausa as an ethnic group, who are about 20.6% of Nigeria have never been President of Nigeria. Balewa was Bageri, Murtala was Berom, Abdulsalami and his adopted brother, Badamosi Babangida were Gwari, Abacha, Kanuri, and Buhari, Shagari and Yar’Adua are Fulani (Fulani are 9%, Igbo’s are 18% while the Yoruba’s, 21%, are the largest ethnic block).

A Way Forward

There was a time when Nigerians thought we had only a little over 200 ethnic groups and languages. Today we know we have over 500! Can the nation survive on ethnic rotated rule? Is this important at this stage in our history? Does rotation of power make any sense? Does indigene vs. non indigene dichotomy have any place in Nigeria today… when several people have inhabited regions far away from home as long as they can remember and have lost all attachment and significance at home; why can these sons of the new soil not become governors of their adopted states, like Obama, the son of a Kenyan father is President of America? Frankly, the fighting makes us look stupid.

It is a fact that continuous hostilities and what appears to be targeted killings of groups in Nigeria continues to feed and fuel ethnic frustrations. When Boko Haram attacks a Church in the north, some Igbo’s publish the event as Igbo targeting. This is exactly the position Boko Haram craves. The truth is however far from this. The problem is the failure of our government to treat all such mob and terrorist crimes as serious offenses and to protect life. Boko Haram for instance kills just as many Muslims and northerners as anyone else. These are mad killers. All civilian killers are mad, and mad no matter how rampant, does not have religious, ethnic or other social identity. It is a thing of the devil and it is the responsibility of the State to arrest it. Should we play into the terrorists hands? When certain Nigerian elite call on the youth to riot and kill others, it is the duty of Nigeria’s government to seize such ‘elders,’ arrest them and accost and capture any rampaging ethnic warrior youth. If this were done properly, the intractable suspicion and beef will have subsided long ago in Nigeria. The truth as has been pointed out is that we the youth are being exploited and used by the politicians who sustain this environment of fake hostility. There is as much or even more ethnic tension and frank hate in the United States for instance, but the government does not exploit this as ours do, but ensures that all those who get extreme are promptly locked up and not allowed to gather violent fans and disciples.

Our verbal and physical violence to each other is not accidental, but is the plan and program of the ‘elite,’ in all regions who harvest the dividends of this tension to garner political clout and pay to keep us in conflict and consequently distracted while they loot us silly.

It is time we drop the dagger. A new government may give those of us who want, a true Sovereign National Conference (SNC) where the progressive youth can sit together and discuss our coexistence, regional governance and resource utilization. The status quo hurts us all while the elite remain in power, become world acknowledged billionaires, as our people in the North remain some of the poorest in the world and people in the East remain marginalized, with no bridge.

Do we stay stuck at ‘who is to blame?’ or do we ask, ‘how do we resolve this?’ Tribalism is not only a crime, it is a sin. Will we, the poor, defeat it now or will we continue to allow it defeat us?

Dr. Peregrino Brimah ( Email: drbrimah@ends.ng ).

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02/21/14

*Nigerians In Spain Condemn Spanish Police Shooting of African Immigrants On The High Sea

By Uchendu Precious Onuoha

It was a day that has generated global uproar when on Thursday the 6th of February 2014, the Spanish local border police opened fire on some 200 sub-Sahara African immigrants who were calling for rescue as they were attempting to cross the high sea from Morocco into the Spanish border town of Ceuta. So far, reports show that not less than 14 bodies have been recovered from the water and each of them with bullet wounds.

Describing the action as grave ‘inhumanity’, the Northern Observatory for Human Rights condemned the shooting as an action that ‘‘violates the international conventions on human rights". ( Continues below..... )

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Photo Above: SOME OF THE RECOVERED DEAD BODIES OF THE AFRICAN IMMIGRANTS SHOT BY SPANISH POLICE AT THE SEA WHILE SWIMMING TO CROSS TO THE BORDER BETWEEN MOROCCO AND SPAIN.

On the part of the Nigerian Community in Madrid and Spain, the action has been condemned in the clearest of terms. In a press release after an emergency meeting of the Leaders of the Nigerian Communities in Madrid at the instance of the Nigerian Nationals Association, the President of the Association Comrade Lamptay Oriakhi described the action as a ‘premeditated act of wickedness’. He added his voice to the Socialist Party’s call for the resignation of all those directly and indirectly responsible for such inhuman act. He informed that while effort is being made by the Association to determine the number of Nigerians involved, the Association has begun a process of calling the African immigrant community together for a nationwide wide protest. Meanwhile, the secretary of the Association Honorable Precious Onuoha affirmed that a letter has officially been written to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) on the Nigerian Community’s disapproval and call for international justice.

While expressing dismay at the actions of the Spanish police, a cross section of the leaders of the Nigerian communities under the aegis of the Nigerian Communities Leadership Interactive Forum Madrid expressed concern over the high state of corruption in Nigeria as a major factor denying Nigerians employment thereby forcing many into such deadly risk.

The President Comrade Lamptay Oriakhi and the Secretary Honourable Prescious Onuoha used the medium to call on all Nigerian and African communities, high commissions and governments to respond to this act of inhumanity and support its condemnation.

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02/20/14

*The Processes Of Election Petitions’ Tribunals In Nigeria & Public Expectations From The Anambra State Governorship Election Petitions’ Tribunal

By Intersociety

(Onitsha Nigeria, 17th of February 2014) -The laws that created rooms for periodic elections into 1, 695 elective public offices in Nigeria, which the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) is empowered to conduct, also allow rooms for Elections’ Petition Tribunals (equivalent of high courts) to handle judicial petitions arising from the conduct of such polls, with a view to determining the authenticity or otherwise of such polls. Such petitions are filed by aggrieved parties. Where no judicial petition is filed at an Election Petition Tribunal within a stipulated time frame, the referenced poll is deemed validly conducted. Matters that are brought before polls’ tribunals are matters that have to do with the conduct of the polls proper. Matters deemed “pre-election matters” such as nomination of candidates, are filed and handled by ordinary high courts, which stretch to the Apex (supreme) Court.

In the Constitution of Nigeria 1999 as amended in 2011 and the Electoral Act of the Federation of 2010, governorship poll tribunal cases start at the tribunal (high court) and terminate at the Supreme Court (three steps). The presidential poll tribunal cases start at the Presidential Poll Tribunal (appeal court) and terminate at the Supreme Court (two steps) and the National and State Assemblies’ poll cases start at the tribunal (high court) and terminate at appeal court (two steps). Of all the poll petitions’ cases, the governorship poll cases have the longest duration of ten (10) months; that is to say six (6) months at the tribunal, two (2) months at the appeal court and two (2) months at the Supreme Court. The presidential poll cases have a total duration of eight (8) months: six (6) months at the presidential poll tribunal (appeal court) and two (2) months at the Supreme Court. The National and State Assemblies’ poll cases last for a total of eight (8) months: six (6) months at the tribunal (high court) and two (2) months at the appeal court.

Constitutional Provisions: By Section 239 (1) of the Constitution of Nigeria 1999, as amended in 2011, the original judicial responsibility of handling and disposing within six (6) months from the date of filing of the petitions (within 21 days after the announcement of final result) arising from the conduct of the presidential poll is rested on the Court of Appeal (first court) and by Section 233 (2) (i), the matter terminates at the Supreme Court. By Section 285(1) (a) (b), the original judicial jurisdiction is conferred on the National and State Assemblies’ Election Petition Tribunal (high court) to hear and determine petitions arising from the conduct of National and State Assemblies’ polls and by Section 246 (1) (b) and (3), the appellate jurisdiction and its finality with respect to the polls under reference is rested on the Court of Appeal. By Section 285 (2), the original jurisdiction in matters of petitions arising from the conduct of governorship polls is rested on the Governorship Election Petitions’ Tribunal. By Section 246 (1) (c), the appellate jurisdiction as per governorship poll petitions is conferred on the Court of Appeal and by Section 233(2) (iv), the apex or final jurisdiction over governorship poll petitions is conferred on the Supreme Court of Nigeria.

By Section 285 (4), the quorum of an election tribunal is properly constituted with the chairman and any other member. By Section 239 (2), the Appeal Court panel is properly constituted at least with three Justices to hear and determine original petitions arising from the conduct of presidential poll. By Section 234 of the Constitution, the Supreme Court panel is properly constituted with not less than five Justices of the Court to hear and determine presidential and governorship appeals brought before it. By Section 285 (5), an Election petition must be filed within twenty-one (21) days after the date of the declaration of the final result of the Election. By Section 285 (6), an Election Tribunal must deliver its judgment in writing within 180 days from the date of the filing of the petition. By Section 285 (7), an appeal from the decision of an Election Tribunal or Court of Appeal in an election matter must be heard and disposed of within 60 days from the date of the delivery of judgment of the Tribunal or Court of Appeal. By Section 285 (8), the court in all final appeals from election matters may adopt the practice of first giving its decision and reserving the reasons to a later date.

Following from the foregoing, the Anambra State Governorship Election Petitions’ Tribunal was created to hear and determine petitions arising from the conduct of November 16, 2013 governorship poll and its supplementary held on November 30, 2013. The Tribunal panelists are Hon. Justice Ishaq Bello of the FCT High Court, who chairs the Tribunal and two others. The poll the Tribunal is investigating judicially produced Mr. Willie Maduabuchi Obiano of the All Progressives Grand Alliance (APGA) as the winner with 180, 178 valid votes, followed by Mr. Tony Nwoye of the Peoples’ Democratic Party (PDP) with 97, 700 votes. Dr. Chris Nwabueze Ngige of the All Progressives Congress (APC) came third with 95, 963 votes and Mr. Ifeanyi Ubah of the Labour Party (LP) came fourth with 37, 495 votes. The four most popular candidates above mentioned polled a total of 411, 331 valid votes.

Out of the State’s total of 4,608 polling units, the poll was successfully conducted in 4, 333 polling units on November 16, 2013. On November 17, 2013, a rescheduled poll was conducted in 65 polling units in Obosi Ward 7 in Idemmili North LGA and on November 30, 2013, a supplementary poll was conducted in 210 polling units scattered in 16 Local Government Areas of Aguata, Awka North, Awka South, Anambra East, Anambra West, Ayamelum, Anaocha, Ekwusigo, Idemmili North, Idemmili South, Ihiala, Nnewi South, Onitsha South, Orumba North and Oyi. Final results were declared on 1st December, 2013 with Mr. Willie Maduabuchi Obiano returned as the winner. By INEC statistics, released on 1st December, 2013, out of a total of 1, 776, 167 registered voters in the State, 465, 891 registered voters were accredited, out of which, 442, 242 voted. And out of the 442, 242 that voted, 425, 254 votes were valid and 16, 988 votes were declared invalid.

The proceedings at the Election Petitions’ Tribunal under reference have four petitions to do justice to. They are: 1. Dr. Chike Obidigbo versus Obiano and two others. 2. Dr. Chris Ngige versus INEC, Obiano, APGA and ACD (Advanced Congress of Democrats). The petition against the ACD is said to have been withdrawn. Two other petitions are: 3. PDP versus INEC & 25 others, and 4. Tony Nwoye versus INEC & 25 others. While the Chairman of the Tribunal, Hon. Justice Ishaq Bello is reputed with election petitions’ cases in various States of the Federation including Imo and Cross River States, there are at least ten members of the inner Bar or Senior Advocates of Nigeria (SANs) involved in the proceedings, defending the declared winner and the INEC as well as the aggrieved parties.

By Section 285 (5) of the Constitution of Nigeria 1999, as amended in 2011, filing of petitions before the Tribunal under reference started and ended between 2nd and 22nd/23rd December, 2013 (within 21 days after the date of declaration of final result). By Section 285 (6), the judgment of the Tribunal will be delivered between now and June 2014 (within 180 days from the date of the filing of the petition). If the Tribunal verdict is delivered at a date in April, or in May or in June, then Section 285 (7) makes it mandatory for its appeal at the Court of Appeal to be heard and disposed of at most in June (for April), or in July (for May), or in August (for June). This is in accordance with the provision under reference, which stipulates: “within 60 days from the date of delivery of the judgment of the Tribunal”. The final verdict on the matter will be delivered by the Supreme Court using the same premise; that is to say at most in August (for June), or in September (for July), or in October (for August). This is also in accordance with same Section 285(7), which stipulates: “within 60 days from the date of delivery of the judgment of the Appeal Court”.

Public Expectations: Proceedings at the Anambra State Governorship Election Petitions’ Tribunal are so far so good and public expectations are very high. The mission of the Tribunal is not only “not for technical justice”, but most importantly, to judicially establish whether the total valid votes cast and announced with the winner under reference are products of legally defined electoral malpractices or products of voters’ register and polling units’ driven cast votes: living votes. Once the Tribunal establishes that the conduct of the poll was in substantial compliance with the Electoral Act of the Federation of 2010, then, the rest is history. This is because the chief business of law courts in the world over is to investigate and establish the facts of a matter and apply them to existing laws relating to issue or matter under judicial enquiry. Courts have no time for frivolities and immaterial facts. This is why we believe that the Tribunal under reference has started well. Its recent pronouncement that “its mission is not for technical justice” is a case in point and commendable.

While giving all the parties level playing grounds to succeed or fail in their cases, is a welcome development, it is very important for the Tribunal not to lose focus of its mission or to be bamboozled by lawyers’ firepower during their arguments and counter-arguments. The doctrine of “orbiter dictum and ratio decidendi” must be their fundamental guide so as to “separate chaffs from seeds” during the proceedings. Since the duration of the Tribunal is now “within 180 days”, unnecessary and abrupt adjournments should be avoided. Adjournments, if any, should be unavoidable and excusable and time lost made up during resumed hearings. The people of Anambra State and the entire world are watching with uttermost consciousness to see how the Tribunal conducts itself and judicial business till the end of its sittings. As sticklers of living votes, we see the judicial enquiry embarked upon by the Tribunal into the Anambra Governorship Poll of 2013 as a process to judicially sanctify the sacred electoral exercise by the Anambra People. We remain the exponent of the fact that “it is better to have 10,000 living votes than to have 1million dead votes”.

Signed:

Emeka Umeagbalasi, Board Chairman
International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law-Intersociety +234(0)8180103912, 8033601078
emekaumeagbalasi@yahoo.co.uk, botchairman@intersociety-ng.org

Emeka Umeagbalasi

Photo Above: Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman, Board of Trustees, Intersociety, 41, Miss Elems Street, Fegge, Onitsha, Anambra State, Nigeria.
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*Grave Lopsidedness In Promotions & Postings In The NPF: Defending The Indefensible

By Intersociety

(Public Statement, Onitsha Nigeria, 11th of February, 2014) -The attention of the leadership of International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law-Intersociety has been drawn to a statement credited to the Public Relations Officer of the Nigeria Police Force (FPRO), Barrister Emeka Frank Mba, a Chief Superintendent of Police (CSP) over our recent three-volume letter to the President & Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Dr. Goodluck Ebele Jonathan. The three-volume letter was also jointly addressed to the Senate President, the Speaker of House of Reps, and the Executive Chairman of the Federal Character Commission and copied to the Inspector General of Police, the Chairman of the Police Service Commission and the Chairman of the Southeast Governors’ Forum & Governor of Anambra State.

In the letter under reference, dated 4th, 5th and 6th of February 2014 and referenced: Intersociety/SE/NG/02/014/FGN/ABJ/FRN, we exposed with incontrovertible pieces of evidence the constitutionally incoherent policy of promotions and postings in the Nigeria Police Force that has made the NPF a sectional and ethno-religiously dominated Police Force. Possibly worried and alarmed by wide media reports of the public-interest letter under reference and shocking revelations contained therein, the FPRO spoke to Folake Sokoya of the Abuja based Sunday Newswatch Newspaper, which was published on 9th of February, 2014 (pages 1 & 2) as follows: “It is quite unfortunate that the IGP is being accused of ethnicity, because he has nothing to do with the promotion and the discipline of officers. The duty falls on the Police Service Commission; it is the Commission that has the authority to promote and discipline NPF officers. They are just wrongly accusing him because they don’t know how the Constitution of the Police works”. He added that “the Police Service Commission is headed by a retired IG, and has the likes of a retired Supreme Court judge, media representative, civil society representative, and so many more interests from all over the country”.

CSP Emeka Frank Mba further said “promotions come with the availability of space, and happen in line with existing seniority, and that the Commission cannot promote more than the establishment can hold and even in the case of special promotions done by the IGP – which occurs only one in a long time – the officer promoted must have done something really outstanding. There can never be more than one IGP and eight DIGs at a time, and if some officers from a particular ethnic group in the country decided to retire or opt out of the service to do businesses like importing containers, thereby giving room for other ethnic group to get promoted when it’s promotion time, then the IGP is not to be blamed at all. If a particular tribe joined the service years after (members of) another ethnic group were recruited, you don’t expect the ones that joined late to be promoted before the ones that were the first to be recruited,”

Our Response: In as much as the NPF statement through its FPRO is an express vindication and authentication of our detailed investigation leading to the letter under reference, the statement amounts to insubordination and disobedience to the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, which includes the Nigeria Police Force. By convention, the NPF ought to allow Mr. President and Commander-in-Chief to fully investigate the issues complained therein and ought not to have commented publicly on the subject matter as a mark of respect, obedience and total loyalty to its C-in-C. Conventional blunders such as the foregoing can earn the IGP a sack under the C-in-C’s right to hire and fire. Such blunders have become a routine in the NPF in recent times to the extent that when representations over officers’ misconducts are made to the NPF high quarters for investigations and appropriate actions, officers or quarters complained against take it upon themselves to investigate themselves. Sometimes, letters sent to IGP directly or through AIGs or ones copied to such AIGs for their information, are assigned for investigation by such AIGs outside the knowledge and authorization of the office of the IGP.

Further, the NPF statement through its FPRO, CSP, Emeka Frank Mba, did not deny the lopsidedness in the NPF’s top promotions and postings, but said in part “the IGP is not to be blamed or held responsible, but the Police Service Commission”. The statement on the other hand contradicted itself by admitting that “IGP does special promotions once in a long time”. The NPF’s statement to the effect that “if some officers from a particular ethnic group in the country decided to retire or opt out of the service to do businesses like importing containers, thereby giving room for other ethnic group to get promoted when it’s promotion time, then the IGP is not to be blamed at all. If a particular tribe joined the service years after (members of) another ethnic group were recruited, you don’t expect the ones that joined late to be promoted before the ones that were the first to be recruited,” is totally derogatory, insulting, barbaric, ethically zealotry and impeachable.

Talking about the “Constitution of the NPF works”, CSP Emeka Frank Mba as a lawyer and possibly a member of the Nigerian Bar Association appears to be one of the tragedies afflicting the NBA in recent times. While we are at loss as per what he means by “the Constitution of the NPF works”, whether in terms of its Establishment Act or its composition, it is disastrous of him and his NPF not to be aware of the supremacy and jealousness of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria 1999 as amended in 2011 over any other law or “constitution” or “composition” in matters of incoherence and inconsistency with her provisions. In the Chapter 1 of her General Provisions under Part 1, Section 1 (3) clearly and unambiguously states “if any other law (or composition) is inconsistent with the provisions of this Constitution, this Constitution shall prevail, and that other law shall to the extent of the inconsistency be void”.

On the issue of “seniority” and “outstanding performance” as existing criteria for promotions and postings in the NPF, the incontrovertible pieces of evidence available to us gravely contradict the NPF claims. Our in-depth findings, also, did not show any records of police officers of Igbo extraction “opting out” or “retiring from the Force” so as to “engage in businesses like importing containers”, contrary to CSP Emeka Frank Mba’s statement on behalf of the NPF. Instead, our empiricist evidence showed that while Igbo police officers are recruited with their counterparts from other federating units under federal character principle, they are subjected to “promotion dormancy” and “tea-making” postings or duty assignments. Many stay in one rank for five years and far above and only get promoted into senior command positions like ACP, DC or CP at twilight of their exit.

Those of them in their minutest numbers, who get promoted as and when due, are usually referred to as “Emir or Kabiyesi Boys”. Some go to the extent of adding “Abdullahi” or “Adekunle” as their middle names jettisoning their “sedentary” mark and replacing it with “pastoralist” mark so as to earn quick promotions. One of such Igbo pastoralist police officers appears to be CSP Emeka Frank Mba, who is from Udenu in Enugu State, Southeast Nigeria. He was born on 9th of October 1972, got enlisted into the NPF on 18th June, 1992, promoted to CSP on 22nd December, 2012 and will retire on 18th June, 2027. He became the FPRO on 20th August, 2013. We clearly understand where he is coming from and those who prepared the script he is dishing out including derogatory remarks against his Igbo tribe. He is a seeming victim of “modern slavery” in the NPF, whereby for his likes to survive in the NPF including earning quick promotions, they must levy war against their people including throwing their weight behind every counter-productive policy pursued in the Force against officers of their own tribe; a sort of “Ifeajunas” of our time.

The truth is that “the seniority” and “outstanding performance” criteria being bandied about or claimed by the NPF are patently fallacious. Promotions and postings in the NPF are strictly based on ethno-religious sentiments and primordial style of policing. Mediocrity and policing imbecility are constantly promoted in place of sound academic and professional excellence. On “seniority issue”, for instance, DIG Suleiman Dauda Fakai(Kebbi State, Northwest) is junior to CP Hilary Opara (Imo State, Southeast). While DIG Fakai was born on 1st November, 1959, he was enlisted on 1st January 1984 and got promoted to DIG on 22nd February, 2012 and will retire on 1st January, 2019. CP Hilary Opara, on his part, was born on 31st July 1955 and enlisted into the NPF on 17th July 1980. He was promoted CP on 18th December 2006 and will retire on 17th July 2015. He has remained in CP’s rank for over seven years. Deputy Commissioner of Police Chris Okey Ezike (Anambra State, Southeast) got enlisted into the NPF same day (31/12/84) with DIG Peter Yisa Gana (Niger State, North-central). While DC Ezike was promoted DC on 1st August 2012, DIG Peter Gana got promoted as a DIG on 20th February 2012. While DC Ezike will retire on 31st April 2019, DIG Peter Yisa Gana will statutorily pull out of the Force on 15th November 2019.

AIG Solomon E. Arase( Edo State, South-south) joined the NPF same day (01/12/81) with CPs Ikechukwu Aduba(Anambra State, Southeast) and Sylvester Umeh (Enugu State, Southeast). While AIG Solomon Arase got promoted as an AIG on 22/02/2012, the duos of CPs Aduba and Umeh have remained CP since 20/12/2010. CP Felix Uyanna ( Anambra State, Southeast) is senior to DIG Atiku Kafur (Katsina State, Northwest). While CP Uyanna joined the NPF on 18th July 1980, DIG Kafur joined same on 8th December 1982 and got promoted as a DIG on 22nd February 2012. CP Uyanna has remained CP since 16th October 2007, a period of over six years. Instances are too many to mention. All the Igbo CPs and DCs under reference hold university degrees as against the IGP who holds a post secondary school diploma and DIG Jonathan Johnson with Teachers’ Grade 11 Certificate. The likes of Ajani Fatai Owoseni (Oyo State, Southwest), Francis Orchia (Benue State, North-central), Gbemisola Akinpelu (Lagos State, Southwest), Peter Edet (Akwa Ibom State, South-south) and Ibrahim Mohammed (Benue State, North-central) are serving Deputy Commissioners of Police in the NPF with West African School Certificate (WASC).

Lastly, our position remains that IGP Mohammed Dahiru Abubakar has a serious case to answer to Mr. President & Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, the leaderships of the National Assembly and the Executive Chairman of the Federal Character Commission over grave lopsidedness in promotions and postings made in the NPF since January 2012 under his headship of the NPF. By the Police Service Commission’s constant and vivid reference to the IGP’s “recommendation” as the premise of its promotions, which is strange and unconstitutional, the IGP is fundamentally responsible and answerable for all the promotions and postings carried out in the Force. The PSC is also an accomplice having allowed its statutory functions to be hijacked and twisted by the headship of the Force. We see the NPF statement under reference as “defending the indefensible”.

Signed:

Emeka Umeagbalasi, Board Chairman
International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law +234(0)8180103912, 8033601078
emekaumeagbalasi@yahoo.co.uk, botchairman@intersociety-ng.org

Emeka Umeagbalasi

Photo Above: Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman, Board of Trustees, Intersociety, 41, Miss Elems Street, Fegge, Onitsha, Anambra State, Nigeria.
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02/13/14

*Bianca Ojukwu, Proctector of Nigerians Abroad – Read More in This Thrilling Interview With Bianca.

By Uchendu Precious Onuoha

The name Bianca Ojukwu may ring a bell to many Nigerians at home, but more among some Nigerians in Austria, and other parts of Europe, especially in the kingdom of Spain where she holds the ace as the Nigerian Ambassador and has become a household name among the Nigerian community in Spain because of the spectacular jobs she has done and achievements recorded during the period she has piloted affairs. As a result of what she has done and is doing to improve the lot of Nigerians in Spain, with the application of citizen diplomacy as her priority, she is wanted all over. Other Nigerians in diaspora in various parts of Europe and the world seem to be jealous of Spain and are craving for her to become their Ambassador. While those in Spain wish her tenure should not end. Others are saying, “Come over to Macedonia and help us”. Many wish to relocate to Spain if not for the economic down turn. Bianca has proved that the good men and women do lives with and after them. ( Continues below..... )

 Bianca Ojukwu

Photo Above: Bianca Ojukwu

Obtaining an appointment for an interview with this dynamic Precious woman is not an easy task because of her busy engagements within and outside Spain as Ambassador, party leader, Nigeria’s permanent representative to the United Nations on Tourism (UNWTO), mother and widow. But once you succeed, you encounter a very beautiful, humane, amiable – mien personality and though behind this veil of beauty is a firm and steel structure. She exhibits a relaxed, calm and composed nature and makes you feel welcome and relaxed in her spacious diplomatic office. She is sharp and supplies answers to questions at ease and as if with ready-made answers. Interviewing her, is like interviewing what I call, a trilogy of the daughter, the father and the husband. Which simply means a composition of three unique personalities involved in one, Bianca, Onoh and Ojukwu. To any Nigerian journalist living at home or abroad, Bianca Ojukwu is a big fish to catch any time, any day. Below are the various issues covered, which center on her life as an Ambassador during her interview on January 9, 2014, with the special correspondent in Spain, Uchendu Precious Onuoha.

What was your immediate reaction the day President Goodluck Jonathan appointed you the Ambassador designate for Spain?

I must say that at the time the announcement was made, it really was a nomination, and it remained to be seen to which country I will be going. Of course I must say that I was pleased to have been given an opportunity to serve my country in that capacity especially at that time when I had experienced a tragedy in my personal life. This nomination offered a ray of hope and a degree of optimism that the future was not bleak. So I must say that I was grateful to the president and Nigerians for giving me the opportunity to serve my country.

As a non-career diplomat, what were the initial challenges you faced, and how did you surmount them?

Luckily for me, since I come from a family where diplomatic experience was something already in existence; it was not that much of a challenge because one way or another I have been exposed to that culture and had garnered a little diplomatic experience vicariously. My uncle was Nigeria’s deputy head of mission and was heading the high commission in Scotland in the eighties. My sister is also a Foreign Service officer of many years standing. And of course with the experience I garnered as a senior special assistant to the president in diaspora matters, it was not a difficult adjustment to make.

In addition to that, I inherited a mission that has seasoned officers with tremendous experience and they were very willing to offer their cooperation, and since I came to this mission, we have all been working together very well. And we refer to the mission as our family. One of the positive things about the Nigerian embassy here in Spain, is that the officers have no problems assuming roles that are not strictly their functions. They cooperate very well with each other and assist one another to ensure the smooth running of the affairs of the mission. So in this respect, I must say it has simply been a collaborative effort.

What was the state of affairs when you took over as ambassador in Spain? And what can you say are your achievements one year after?

When I came to Spain and assumed my duties one thing that was immediately glaring was the fact that the chancery building was not in a state befitting of the status of Nigeria on the international scene. The ambassador’s residence was also in a very poor state and had not been well maintained, and neither were most of the properties belonging to the embassy. As a matter of fact, when I first arrived in Madrid I had to stay in a hotel for many months before we were able to get the Ambassador’s residence in a fit and proper state.

I was also faced with many disturbing reports about the situation of Nigerians resident in Spain. And I was soon to learn that many of them felt that they were not properly taken into consideration in some of the decisions taken by the mission and that the mission ought to do more to safeguard their rights as citizens and to promote their dignity and integrity. We realized that the work done by the mission needed essentially to center around the mandate that we, as ambassadors were given prior to assuming our duties. The President had made it crystal clear that citizen diplomacy should be at the very apex of our priorities and this is something that is continuously reiterated. As a matter of fact, during the recent induction ceremony of new ambassadors, the minister of foreign affairs Prof Viola Onwuliri made it quite clear that as ambassadors, the protection and welfare of citizens in host countries should be of paramount priority.

The maltreatment of Nigerians abroad, she reiterated, should not be condoned in any shape or fashion by any Ambassador or head of mission and that we must try to ensure that Nigerians are treated with respect and dignity. And so, faced with many cases where the rights of our citizens were being infringed upon, cases involving many Nigerians in detention who felt that the embassy should be doing more to address their plight, it became imperative to intensify our efforts.

Also there were many reported incidents involving Nigerians who were subjected to a stop and search process. Many of our citizens were also affected by the economic recession in Spain and their fortunes took a down turn. A great number were out of work and had lost their jobs, many had become destitute and homeless and the only sanctuary they felt they had was the mission. Also consequent upon this recession was that many Nigerian couples were no longer able to cater for the welfare and maintenance of their children and this meant that for the benefit of these children, they were taken away from their parents and taken into protective custody, or given away to other Spanish families for adoption or families who could take better care of them.

Many Nigerian couples have lost sometimes from one child to six or even eight children. We recently secured the release of four children of the same parents from protective custody of Spanish authorities and successfully relocated them back to Nigeria. We endeavor to look at each situation on a case by case basis to determine how best to resolve it. We often made contact with their families back home to make them aware of what was happening to their relatives in Spain and get them to work with us to provide at least an environment back home where these children would be better accommodated and taken care of once we relocate them back to Nigeria. Of course, the priority for us is always how to retrieve these children from the authorities here and at the same time to ensure that they are not going into a worse situation when they are re-united with their parents and families and that there is an adequate support system in place for them back home in Nigeria.

Sadly in Spain, we have also witnessed situations of untimely deaths and murders of our nationals. The most recent painful incident was the murder of a certain Miss Ada Ortuya by a Spanish martial arts expert. The mission stepped into the matter and made it clear that this murder of our citizen would not be tolerated, that it is our responsibility to ensure that this heinous crime is not swept under the carpet and continued to intensify our demand that justice be done in this matter and the suspect brought to book to face the full wrath of the law.

In addition, we are also dealing with the human trafficking issue which is rampant here in Spain. We are looking into prostitution, exploitation of young children and young girls. And as a matter of fact, there was a recent case where we successfully rescued a young Nigerian girl who was lured to Spain by a Spaniard who visited Nigeria and got her pregnant. She was underage. The Spaniard provided false information regarding her age to process her documents for her to come here to Spain with her child. When she got here, he proceeded to abuse her physically. Faced with constant violence and abuse, the situation got so serious that the police had to be called in. The case went to court. Surprisingly the man was found not guilty. This poor girl was naturally afraid for her life ran to a shelter that was provided by an NGO to harbor victims of violence.

We were contacted by this NGO and the embassy swung into action to secure travel documents for the girl and her child since she had expressed a desire to return back to Nigeria. We got in touch with her family back home and we were able to get her and her child safely back to her family. We have also dealt with various other incidents of this nature and are working very closely with the unions and the federation of Nigerian communities as well as various Nigerian associations to ensure that cases affecting our nationals are quickly brought to our attention. And whenever our intervention is needed, we try to act in a very timely and effective manner.

Moreover, we are calling upon our nationals to join any of these associations because the association executives interact very harmoniously with the mission. They are the ones who quickly bring to our attention the plight of our citizens and incidents which we need to investigate. We are also asking them to be proactive in terms of obtaining repatriation insurance because, whereas we think that it is not important, we come from a society where it is customary to transport our remains home should we pass on in another country. This is a very expensive process, and Repatriation insurance takes care of this if the need arises.

This is very important for our families back home. So thankfully Nigerian organizations, have been doing a very good job of sensitizing their members to obtain repatriation insurance which is not very expensive and to liaise more closely with them so that by extension we are able to quickly come in and assist in situations where the fundamental human rights of Nigerians in any part of Spain is threatened.

Nigerians in Spain are looked down upon as illiterates despite their high level of education and this has accounted for their inability get decent jobs in the country, what are you doing to correct this wrong perception?

This is not a perception that is solely limited to Spain. It is of course a form of racism which Africans in general, Nigerians as well as other nationalities encounter in their host countries. First and foremost they are regarded as being different and as economic migrants. What generally happens is that subconsciously, their hosts sometimes tend to treat them like second rate citizens without giving them an opportunity to prove themselves. This perception becomes heightened in countries undergoing an economic crisis or depression.

Of course you must agree with me that this is not a perception that is general. A more recent trend is that the younger generation tend to be more accommodating and less ignorant about Africans and are no longer really subject to some of those prejudices and misconceptions that their parents have about Africans. The major challenge for Nigerians in Spain is the language barrier and attendant difficulty in integration Which means that for the average Nigerian in Spain proficiency in Spanish is vital with regards to employment opportunities.

We are all aware that Nigerians are always in a hurry to quickly find their footing whenever they arrive at a new country. The general trend is that many of them don’t even make the initial efforts to learn the language so that they can be able to communicate in the language of the host It is important also to know how the people of the country that you have chosen to live in react as well as their attitudes and cultural orientation as this will also influence more rapid integration.

I don’t think Spaniards are as racist as they have been portrayed. As a matter of fact, I think that they have been quite accommodating of immigrants until quite recently as a consequence of their economic crisis. I believe that with time as the economy gets better, Nigerians will find a better environment in which to thrive. We are advising Nigerians intending to settle in Spain to be well educated with skills, so that they don’t just turn up without having something to offer. If you have no qualifications and no skills, you will find that that dream of Eldorado is one that quickly disintegrates before your eyes.

What about the possibility of evaluating the documents and certificates obtained from Nigeria with the Spanish government so that qualified Nigerians can use them to work?

We have had inquiries from Spanish authorities regarding issues of authentication of documents obtained in Nigeria We can authenticate certain documents but there are some that will take a prolonged period of time to authenticate. And unfortunately there are time limits within which most certifications have been made to Spanish authorities. Regarding document validation status for Nigerians here, what we are trying to do is to liaise the agencies and relevant authorities in Nigeria for a more rapid authentication of these documents. Sometimes we make that communication directly with the institutions in Nigeria

We are trying to avoid a situation where the embassy is constrained to deal with every inquiry that is placed at its doorstep including the trivial ones .However, any assistance in this regard that will enhance the prospects of our citizens in terms of employment will be rendered whenever needed.

There is alarming rate of deportation of Nigerians in Spain and the Spanish police brutality of Nigerians during deportation, what could be done to minimize that?

This increasing rate of deportation is not limited to Spain, the U.K. deports more Nigerians. The same with Italy. What we have done here in Spain is to ensure a continued interface and engagement with the ministry of interior and the National police to ensure that all deportations carried out here comply with International standards and requirements governing deportation. . We insist that before any Nigerian is deported, it must be brought to the attention of the embassy. We also insist that the deportation must be consequent upon a court order. We have been engaging positively with the police and the relevant authorities in this respect and they are cooperating with us. Also we have an agreement with the authorities that young children should not be separated from their mothers at deportation meaning that a mother cannot be deported without her infant child.

Where, as a result of a court order our national is facing deportation, we usually make a request that he must be given reasonable time within which he can arrange for assets and properties he must have acquired during his sojourn abroad to be properly administered in his absence. We are constantly working to reduce the number of deportations and we must acknowledge that deportations actually have decreased in terms of frequency and numbers in the past one year certainly. We are given the opportunity to go to the detention centers to speak to the detainees to confirm if they are Nigerians and we also encourage Nigerians in detention in these detention centers to communicate their needs to the embassy in writing from time to time. As a general rule, we do not approve all the names presented to the embassy in a deportation list. It is our prerogative to reject certain names that may be contained in the list for want of evidence or additional information that supports the deportation measure.

You occupy two positions as an ambassador and a party leader, how do you cope with these two demanding tasks?

I am an ambassador for Nigeria, for all Nigerians here in Spain irrespective of political party affiliation, ethnicity or religion. So in that respect it has not been tasking.

Before your appointment, did you nurse the ambition for a political appointment?

No.

Why did you not ride on the influence and popularity of your late husband to vie for elective political office?

My primary duty and commitment was to my family and to my marriage. And so being married to a personality such as Ikemba, was something that came with so many roles and functions, many of them quite demanding. He had a very busy schedule. He was involved in so many issues. For what he represented to his people it was a 24 hour function. He was always interacting with communities, solving communal and land disputes, brainstorming with executives of progressive unions, community leaders and traditional rulers, and was also involved with local government, state and national issues. It was a very hectic and busy life and my role was essentially a supporting one which did not afford any time for me to think or to nurse any political ambition although I come from a political family.

I was also running my own businesses and actively involved in so many projects in addition to being a mother tasked with the upbringing of young children that I was left with very little time to dwell on the prospects of a political role. In the aftermath of my husband’s death, I acquired a lot of responsibilities and had, like most other widows, to assume the roles of mother and father in addition to filling in the gaps in many other spheres occasioned by his demise with regards to political organizations, religious groups town unions, community development associations, Igbo cultural groups, and most importantly the Biafra war veterans. He was the grand patron of the organization and interacted quite closely with them in terms of promoting issues relating to their welfare and rehabilitation.

With the records and achievements Nigerian women like you have made in government when given the opportunity, what do you think Nigeria would be like having a female president like you in the future?

I think that Nigerian women have made giant strides in virtually all areas of development. In government they have shown themselves to be capable, reliable, and effective in discharging their responsibilities. But we must not fail to give credit to the activism of the first lady, Dame Patience Jonathan, who has been at the fore front ensuring an equitable share for women and in all sectors of development and has launched a successful campaign to promote full participation of women at all levels of decision making in government. And it is really a testament to her tenacity in this respect that there is now a greater degree of gender balance in nomination of women for political appointments. It is to the credit of her campaign to demand on behalf of Nigerian women, greater access to, and full participation in power structures and decision making at the national level that such key ministries as finance, petroleum, telecommunications, aviation, environment, and until recently education and defense are headed by women. The current minister of foreign affairs is also a woman. I believe that it is really a major triumph for Nigerian women. And we should realize that it was not an easy battle.

Women, when given the opportunity will not fail. In their respective communities, they have shown really that they are capable of handling the responsibilities that are assigned to them. And I think that in future, we need to continue to work as we have been doing. I don’t subscribe to the school of thought that Nigerian men have not done well. I think that in every society it is a symbiotic relationship. There is no doubt that women need the support of our men folk. No matter how advanced any society claims to be and regardless of the attainment of equal rights for women, we cannot discountenance the fact that in our own culture, women are first and foremost wives and then mothers. These are badges we wear with pride. While more and more women are now assuming highly tasking roles within the work place; they will still continue to need the support of their husbands if they expect to succeed in the precarious balancing act of maintain their homes and excelling at the work place. So, Yes, Nigerian women have done well and we will yet do more.

By the time you are done as an ambassador, what would you like to be remembered for?

Well, before I can answer that question, it might be necessary to enunciate briefly what the functions of an ambassador are. As principle representatives of the President in our host countries, we should be able to consolidate the existing relationships between Nigeria and our host country. We should also able to foster new alliances with a view to promoting stronger links with the private sector. Closely linked to this is the imperative need to attract foreign direct investment as well as skills and technologies to facilitate the creation of jobs and wealth for our citizens at home, and when possible, in the diaspora. It is also our responsibility to effectively address negative perceptions about our country, and of paramount importance, as I stated earlier is Citizen Diplomacy which essentially entails the promotion of the welfare and security of our citizens in our host countries. These are the objectives that were enumerated by the minister of Foreign Affairs, Professor Viola Onwuliri during the induction of new ambassadors recently, and have always constituted the ambassadorial desiderata.

At the end of my tenure I would like to be remembered for doing all within my power to come to the aid and assistance of our distressed citizens and defending their rights and interests whenever infringed upon. I would also like to be credited with having promoted stronger ties and stronger bilateral relations between Nigeria and the kingdom of Spain as well as my efforts towards enhancing the image of Nigerians here in Spain; Infrastructure wise, by the massive renovation works that we have carried out on the chancery building as well as the residence of the ambassador which has made it easier to conduct diplomatic engagements and functions within befitting structures that enhance the image and prestige of our country and which is a source of pride to our citizens here in Spain.

As a former beauty queen, you still look ageless what are your beauty routines?

Work hard, eat well, and sleep early.

What fashion item do you like most and how much can you spend on it?

Don’t ask me those questions, laughs….

Are you a perfume person and what type do you use?

What I can tell you is that my favorite perfume is an old fragrance which has been discontinued. It is no longer manufactured. It is called ZADIG by an Italian designer Emilio Pucci. As a matter of fact, the bottle which I am currently using and is one which I bought in 1982 at the duty free shop at Frankfurt Airport. Since I cannot replace it, I use it only on special occasions.

Still in use till now?

like I said I only use it on special occasions… on birthdays, laughs… I intend to stretch it out for as long as I can.

It’s like it will last for eternity?

I hope so, if I live for eternity! But all good things must come to an end!

How does your typical day begin?

When I wake up, I do my meditations, Have my breakfast, respond to my mails, and prepare for the office. Most times I have engagements outside my office. An ambassador has multiple functions in a country such as Spain, with diplomatic engagements and a lot of social events that revolve round non-governmental organizations, Madrid is a conference city and routinely plays host to many international trade fairs and exhibitions in addition to the events that are traditionally hosted by the Royal Family. It is renowned as a richly cultural city and its museums and galleries are home to many priceless famous works of art. There are many foundations that promote art exhibitions and countless charities.

What is your message to the Nigerian community in the kingdom of Spain?

I would like to request that they remain law abiding, that they remain good visitors to their hosts that they try as much as possible not to infringe on their laws and regulations but continually strive towards a more harmonious relationship with their hosts. They should also avail themselves of the opportunity to learn the Spanish language so that they can be integrated into the society because this will enlarge the opportunities open to them. They must remember that the good image of our country remains our collective responsibility and therefore they should strive at all times to preserve that image and defend the integrity of Nigeria.

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Map of Nigeria

02/08/14

*SpecialReport 8/2/2014: Unmasking "Dogari" Policy In The Nigeria Police Force - Part 3

By Intersociety

Ref.: Intersociety/SE/NG/02/014/FGN/ABJ/FRN

1. His Excellency
Dr. Goodluck Ebele Jonathan
President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria & Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces
Thro
Senator Anyim Pius Anyim, Secretary to the Government of the Federation
The SGF Office, Shehu Shagari Complex
Three Arms Zone, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

2. Senator David Mark, President of the Senate, Federal Republic of Nigeria
Thro
The Chairman, Senate Committee on Police Affairs
The Senate Chambers, National Assembly Complex
Three Arms Zones, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

3. Honourable Aminu Tambuwal
Speaker, House of Representatives, Federal Republic of Nigeria
Thro
The Chairman, House Committee on Police Affairs
The House of Reps Chambers, National Assembly Complex
Three Arms Zone, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

4. Prof. Shuaibu Oba AbdulRaheem
Executive Chairman, Federal Character Commission
The FCC Headquarters, Plot 64, First Avenue
Off Shehu Shagari Way, Maitama
FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

Sirs,

Unmasking “Dogari/Dansanda” Policy In The Nigeria Police Force & A Case Against Sectional Domination In Promotions & Postings Of Key Officers In The Force (Part Three)

(Onitsha Nigeria, 6th day of February, 2014)-As promised in the first part (Part 1) of this all-important letter, this is its concluding part (part three). It contains the names of serving CPs from Southwest, Northeast and South-south zones as well as the number of serving DCPs, ACPs and CSPs and their geopolitical origins in the Nigeria Police Force, updated as at 31st day of January, 2014.

CPs From Southwest Zone: The seventeen (17) CPs from Southwest zone are 1. Adeola Adeleke Adeniji (Ogun State), 2. Adebayo Ajileye (Ondo State), 3. Jubril Olawale Adeniji (Lagos State), 4. Adenrele Tasheed Shinaba (Lagos State), 5. James O. Caulcrick (Lagos State), 6. Sherifat A. Disu Olajoku (Lagos State), 7. Johnson A. Ogunsakin( Ekiti State), 8. Tonye Ebiye Ebitibituwa (Ondo State), 9. Olufemi A. Adenaike (Ogun State), 10. Olufemi David Ogunbayode (Ogun State), 11. Titilayo Musiliu Busari (Oyo State), 12. Foluso Adebanjo (Lagos State), 13. Agbola Oshodi-Glover (Lagos State), 14. A.K. Shodipo( Lagos State), 15.Nasiru Disu Oki (Osun State), 16. Kayode C. Aderanti (Osun State), 17. Adenike Fehintola Abuwa (medical doctor) (Ekit State).

CPs From Northeast Zone: The thirteen (13) CPs from Northeast zone are 1. Usman Akila Gwarry (Borno State), 2. Danladi Yilami Mshelbwala (Borno State), 3. Stephen Audu (Gombe State), 4. Adams Audu( Borno State), 5. Yahaya Garba Ardo (Gombe State), 6. Irimiya F. Yerima (Taraba State), 7.Idris Faruk Umar (Yobe State), 8. Hyacinth Medugu Dagala (Borno State), 9. Marcus K. Danladi (Gombe State), 10. Mohammed Sani Usman (Bauchi State), 11. Aminchi Samaila Baraya (Taraba State), 12. Usman Alkali Baba ( Yobe State) and 13. Tijani Baba (Yobe State).

CPs From South-south Zone: The eleven (11) CPs from South-south zone are 1. Ambrose O. Aisabor (Edo State), 2. Christian Akioja Olakpe ( Delta State), 3. A.J. Abakasanga (Akwa Ibom State), 4. Benjamin Uche Onwuka (Delta State), 5. Desiye Desire Nsirim (Bayelsa State), 6. Mbu Joseph Mbu (Cross River State), 7. Patrick Dey Dokumor ( Bayelsa State), 8. Sontonye Leroy Wakama (Rivers State), 9. Isaac Chinonyerem Eke (Rivers State), 10. Kalafite Helen Adeyemi (Rivers State) and 11. Victor O.E. Onofiok (Akwa Ibom State).

Serving DCPs, ACPs & CSPs & Their Geopolitical Origins: Out of a total of one hundred & seventy-two (172) serving Deputy Commissioners of Police in the NPF including fifteen (15) specialists, Southeast zone has the least number with 20, followed by Northeast with 25, North-central 29, Northwest 33, Southwest 35 and South-south 37. And out of 20 serving Southeast DCPs, four will retire this year (2014), two in 2015 and three in 2016. Out of three hundred & ninety-eight (398) serving Assistant Commissioners of Police including fifteen (15) specialists, Southeast zone, again, has the least number with 38, followed by Northwest with 55, Northeast 55, North-central 85, Southwest 86 and South-south 88. And out of 38 serving ACPs from Southeast zone, four will retire this year (2014), one in 2015 and eight in 2016. Out of nine hundred & six (906) investigated and confirmed serving Chief Superintendents of Police (CSPs) in the NPF, Northwest zone tops the list with 186, followed by South-south with 155, North-central 152, Southwest 147, Southeast 142 and Northeast 122. And out of 142 CSPs from Southeast zone, 12 will retire between 2014 and 2017 and eight between 2018 and 2019.

Apart from gross lopsidedness and sectional domination of the NPF top promotions being complained of, postings in the Force top field duties are also faulty and incoherent with the provisions of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria 1999, especially her Section 14 (3). For instance, the 12 zonal commands of the Force are dominated by an ethno-religious section of the country, particularly by Northwest zone. AIGs Suleiman A. Abba (Jigawa State, Northwest), heads Zone 7, Abuja, Mamman Ibrahim Tsafe (Zamfara State, Northwest), heads Zone 2, Lagos, Saliu Argungu Hashimu (Kebbi State, Northwest), heads Zone 5, Benin, Mohammed Jinjiri Abubakar (Kano State, Northwest), heads Zone 3, Yola, Tambari Mohammed (Sokoto State, Northwest), heads Zone 1, Kano, Sule Mamman (Katsina State, Northwest), heads Zone 10, Sokoto, Mohammed J. Gana (Niger State, North-central), heads Zone 12, Bauchi, Ballah Magaji Nasarawa (Kebbi State, Northwest), heads Zone 9, Umuahia. All the above names are Hausa-Fulani Muslims, dominated by Northwest zone. In the spirit of federal character, equity and fairness, the 12 zonal commands ought to be occupied by two AIGs from each of the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria. The assignment of “tea-making” operational duties to senior officers of none Hausa-Fulani Muslims is a case in point in the posting of AIG Edgar Tam Nanakumo (Bayelsa State, South-south) as “AIG in-charge of Force Animal Branch”.

Where It Concerns Mr. President & Commander-In-Chief:
From pieces of incontrovertible evidence provided in this all-important letter, Sir, a case of grave violation of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria 1999 and the federal character principle has been established against the leadership of the Nigeria Police Force, under IGP Mohammed Dahiru Abubakar. As Mr. President is aware, Section 14 (3) of the Constitution under reference forbids and prohibits any form of sectional domination in the distribution of public posts and socio-economic infrastructures among various federating units of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. The “various federating units of the Federal Republic of Nigeria” are fairly captured by six geopolitical zonal arrangements, which Mr. President usually rely on in the course of any public appointments, be they ministers, heads of parastatals or service chiefs. Even in the appointment of Police DIGs, a picture of geopolitical balance is usually painted by the IGP and the PSC.

In view of the foregoing Mr. President, it is a fact to say that the present leadership of the Nigeria Police Force has positioned the Northwest geopolitical zone to control and head the Force in the next ten years or more; a sort of “dogari/dansanda” policy or “Hausa Constabulary” policy of the pre-independence police policies in Nigeria. It may not be out of place to say that the next IGP has already been penciled down by M.D. Abubakar NPF leadership in the person of either DIG Suleiman Dauda Fakai (Kebbi State, Northwest), with his retirement period stretching up to February 2019 or DIG Atiku Kafur (Katsina State, Northwest) with retirement period of February 2017. Similar situation may be applicable in those in the position of AIG, in case the next IGP is to be picked from their ranks as was the case with the present IGP, Mr. M.D. Abubakar in January 2012. Among the 11 serving AIGs retained by the Northwest zone, seven of them will retire between 2017 and 2019; this makes each of them an IGP material. Similar situation is found among 21 serving CPs retained by the zone under reference.

In view of the foregoing Mr. President, we demand for your immediate intervention and ordering of full scale and conclusive investigation into the promotion and posting policy of the present Nigeria Police Force. As Mr. President may be aware, the Police Service Commission now operates the opposite side of the law establishing it including Section 153 and Supplementary Sections 29 & 30 of Part 1 of Third Schedule to the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria 1999 as amended in 2011. For instance, Supp. Section 30 says: “The Police Service Commission shall have power to appoint persons to offices in the Nigeria Police Force other than that of the IGP and dismiss and exercise disciplinary control over persons holding such offices”. Sadly, the PSC now functions as “a stamping commission”, by stamping whatever names sent across to it by the IGP, no matter how lopsided or sectionalized they appear.

It is impeachable for the Northwest zone that produces the present IGP to also take two serving DIGs and 11, out of 21 serving AIGs, leaving North-central with 5, South-south with 2, Southwest with 2, Northeast with only 1 and Southeast with nothing. Other areas where there are strong accusations of sectional domination particularly by Northwest and to an extent, by North-central and Northeast Muslim officers at the alleged instance of IGP are those manning strategic NPF field formations like Special Protection Units (SPUs), Mobile Squadrons (MSQs), Federal & State SARS, Area Commands, State Criminal Investigation Departments (SCIDs), Anti-Terrorism Squads (ATSs) and Divisional Police Stations (DPSs/DPOs). Your Excellency’s investigation should be extended to such areas.

On account of our demand for Mr. President’s full scale investigation, it is our further demand that a thorough shake up should be carried out in the NPF command hierarchy, which will include mass retirement of all serving DIGs and AIGs so as not only to pave way for injection of new blood in the NPF command hierarchy, but also to put in place geopolitically oriented policy for future promotions and postings. As the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces and Chairman of the Nigeria Police Council, both law and convention are at Your Excellency’s beck and call to sanitize and reposition the NPF. Our firm position remains that no geopolitical zone including Southeast zone should be allowed to sectionalize or dominate federal public posts and infrastructures, at the expense of other federating partners of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

Where It Concerns The National Assembly Leaderships:
The President of the Senate and the House Speaker are called upon to direct their standing committees’ chairmen on police affairs to carry out thorough and conclusive investigations to ascertain the pattern of promotions and postings in the NPF and summon the IGP to appear before their chambers with documentary details of his “recommendations for promotion” policy in the NPF and defend its conformity or otherwise with the provisions of the Constitution including Section 14(3). The IGP should also be mandated by the National Assembly to be attending his NPF budget defense; be it substantive or supplementary, with written details of all officers promoted or recommended for promotion, which must include their geopolitical zonal origins; failure of which should attract standing down his request for approval of the NPF budget until full compliance is made.

Where It Concerns The Chairman Of The Federal Character Commission:
As the Executive Chairman of the FCC, the FCC Establishment Act of 1996 enjoins your Commission to “implement and enforce federal character principle of fairness and equity in the distribution of public posts and socio-economic infrastructures among various federating units of the Federal Republic of Nigeria”. As a result, we demand your Commission’s immediate investigation into the impeachable lopsidedness in the promotions and postings of senior members of the Nigeria Police Force with a view to enforcing equity and fairness in the exercise. Your Commission’s investigation will answer the question as in: whether federal character principle, equity and fairness were met in allowing Northwest geopolitical zone to produce the present IGP, two, out of seven serving DIGs, eleven out of 21 serving AIGs, twenty-one, out of 88 serving CPs, 186, out of 906 serving CSPs and manning of eight, out of 12 zonal commands, manned by AIGs, etc as well as domination of other strategic operational postings in the Force.

Your Commission should also extend its investigation into other areas where there are strong accusations of sectional domination particularly by Northwest and to an extent, by North-central and Northeast Muslim officers. Specifically, duty postings made with respect to those manning the command cadres of strategic NPF field formations like Special Protection Units (SPUs), Mobile Squadrons (MSQs), Federal & State SARS, Area Commands, State Criminal Investigation Departments (SCIDs), Anti-Terrorism Squads (ATSs) and Divisional Police Stations (DPSs/DPOs) should be thoroughly and conclusively investigated to ensure their coherence at all times with federal character principle, equity and fairness.

It is our hope that this letter in its completeness will be expeditiously looked into and issues of extreme importance raised therein addressed frontally. CLICK TO READ PART 2 OF THIS WRITE-UP.

Yours Faithfully,
International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law-Intersociety

Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman of the Board
+234(0)8033601078, +234(0)8180103912
emekaumeagbalasi@yahoo.co.uk, botchairman@intersociety-ng.org

Comrade Justus Uche Ijeoma, Head, Publicity Desk
+234(0)8037114869

CC:
1. The Inspector General of Police, Force Headquarters, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria
2. Chairman, Police Service Commission, the PSC Headquarters, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria
3. Chairman of Southeast Governors’ Forum & Governor of Anambra State, Awka, Nigeria

Emeka Umeagbalasi

Photo Above: Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman, Board of Trustees, Intersociety, 41, Miss Elems Street, Fegge, Onitsha, Anambra State, Nigeria.
- CLICK FOR ANOTHER PHOTO.

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Map of Nigeria

02/05/14

*SpecialReport 5/2/2014: Unmasking "Dogari" Policy In The Nigeria Police Force - Part 2

By Intersociety

Ref.: Intersociety/SE/NG/02/014/FGN/ABJ/FRN

1. His Excellency
Dr. Goodluck Ebele Jonathan
President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria & Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces
Thro
Senator Anyim Pius Anyim, Secretary to the Government of the Federation
The SGF Office, Shehu Shagari Complex
Three Arms Zone, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

2. Senator David Mark, President of the Senate, Federal Republic of Nigeria
Thro
The Chairman, Senate Committee on Police Affairs
The Senate Chambers, National Assembly Complex
Three Arms Zones, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

3. Honourable Aminu Tambuwal
Speaker, House of Representatives, Federal Republic of Nigeria
Thro
The Chairman, House Committee on Police Affairs
The House of Reps Chambers, National Assembly Complex
Three Arms Zone, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

4. Prof. Shuaibu Oba AbdulRaheem
Executive Chairman, Federal Character Commission
The FCC Headquarters, Plot 64, First Avenue
Off Shehu Shagari Way, Maitama
FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

Sirs,

Unmasking “Dogari/Dansanda” Policy In The Nigeria Police Force & A Case Against Sectional Domination In Promotions & Postings Of Key Officers In The Force (Part Two)

(Onitsha Nigeria, 5th day of February, 2014)-As promised in the first part (Part 1) of this all-important letter, this is its continuation. It contains the names of all serving AIGs and CPs in the Nigeria Police Force, their geopolitical origins and other useful information. The CPs’ names in this part two covered those of Southeast, Northwest and North-central zones.

Serving AIGs: The worst of it all is the case of the 21 serving AIGs in the NPF and their geopolitical representation. Out of the 21 serving AIGs including one specialist, none of them comes from the Southeast geopolitical zone; an important Nigeria’s federating partner populated by one of the three largest ethnic groups in Nigeria (Igbo). This has made this important federating partner an endangered species in the country including being prone to ethno-religious violence and next door enemy to other federating partners. Out of the 21 serving AIGs under reference, Northwest geopolitical zone is, again, given eleven, North-central five, South-south two, Southwest two, Northeast one and Southeast zero.

The eleven serving AIGs from the Northwest zone and their birth, enlistment, promotion and retirement dates are: 1. Suleiman A. Abba ( Jigawa State), birth: 22/03/59, enlistment: 31/12/84, promotion: 22/02/2012, retirement:22/03/2019, 2. Mamman Ibrahim Tsafe (Zamfara State), birth: 19/02/57, enlistment: 31/12/84, promotion: 22/02/2012, retirement: 19/02/2017. 3. Saliu Argungu Hashimu (Kebbi State), birth: 10/07/57, enlistment: 11/12/84, promotion: 22/02/2012, retirement: 10/07/2017. 4. Bala A. Hassan (Kano State), birth: 25/08/59, enlistment: 08/12/82, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 08/12/2017. 5. Mohammed Jingiri Abubakar (Kano State), birth: 20/08/58, enlistment: 01/01/84, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 20/08/2018. 6. Tambari Y. Mohammed (Sokoto State), birth: 01/10/56, enlistment: 31/12/84, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 01/10/2016. 7. Sule Mamman (Katsina State), birth: 10/08/55, enlistment: 08/12/82, promotion: 30/01/2013, retirement: 10/08/2015. 8. Ballah Magaji Nasarawa (Kebbi State), birth: 26/07/61, enlistment: 31/12/84, promotion: 24/09/2013, retirement: 31/12/2019. 9. Sabo Ringim Ibrahim (Jigawa State), birth: 02/04/57, enlistment: 31/12/84, promotion: 24/09/2013, retirement: 02/04/2017. 10. Fana Abdullahi Salisu (Kebbi State), birth: 01/06/56, enlistment: 30/07/79, promotion: 16/01/2014, retirement: 30/07/2014 and 11. Musa Abdulsalam Daura (Katsina State), birth: 02/10/57, enlistment: 31/12/84, promotion: 16/01/2014, retirement: 02/10/2017.

The five AIGs from the North-central geopolitical zone are: 1. Dan’Azumi Job Doma (Niger State), birth: 22/10/59, enlistment: 01/01/84, promotion: 22/02/2012, retirement: 01/01/2019. 2. Christopher Terhem Dega (Benue State), birth: 11/03/55, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 11/03/2015. 3. Mark Adamu Idakwo (Kogi State), birth: 23/04/55, enlistment: 15/07/80, promotion: 30/01/2013, retirement: 23/04/2015. 4. Adisa Baba Bolanta (Kwara State), birth: 14/07/56, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 30/01/2013, retirement: 14/07/2016 and 5. Mohammed J. Gana (Niger State), birth: 31/12/57, enlistment: 01/01/84, promotion: 24/09/2013, retirement: 31/12/2017.

The two AIGs representing South-south zone are 1. Edgar Tam. Nanakumo (Bayelsa State), birth: 31/08/57, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 24/09/2013, retirement: 01/12/2016 and 2. Solomon A. Arase (Edo State), birth: 21/06/56, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 22/02/2012, retirement: 20/06/2016. The two AIGs from Southwest zone are 1. Samuel Ilesanmi Aguda of Police Communications Airwing(specialist)( Ekiti State), birth: 28/09/54, enlistment: 15/03/82, promotion: 23/02/2012, retirement: 28/09/2014 and 2. David O. Omojola (Ekiti State), birth: 10/01/55, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 22/02/2012, retirement: 10/01/2015. The only AIG from Northeast zone is Kakwe Christopher Katso (Taraba State), birth: 29/09/59, enlistment: 31/12/84, promotion: 16/01/2014, retirement: 29/09/2019. Another shocking discovery from the list of the 21 serving AIGs in the present NPF, apart from the inexcusable and despicable exclusion of the Southeast zone from the list is that no woman is among the 21 AIGs. This is despite the fact that women first enrolled into the NPF as far back as 1955. Further fact is that one of the oldest serving police officers/CPs in the present NPF is a woman. She is Mrs. Chintua Amajor-Onu (Abia State, Southeast). She was enlisted on 01/12/81 and has been a CP since 20/12/2010.

Serving CPs: The geopolitical lopsidedness is also manifested in the 88 serving Commissioners of Police in the NPF including four specialists. In the list, the Southeast geopolitical zone has the least number of serving CPs with eight. Out of the said 88 CPs, the Northwest geopolitical zone, the zone of the present IGP, Mr. Mohammed D. Abubakar; has twenty-one (21) CPs, followed by North-central with 18 CPs, Southwest 17 CPs, Northeast 13 CPs, South-south 11 CPs and Southeast with only 8 CPs. Another shocking aspect of the foregoing is that all the eight Southeast CPs have between this year (2014) and 2016 to retire either by clocking mandatory retirement age of 60 years or mandatory retirement service age of 35 years.

While three of them: Godfrey E. Okeke(16/09/2014), Ikechukwu Aduba (09/07/2014) and Sylvester A. Umeh(10/11/2014) will retire this year (2014), three: Felix Osita Uyanna (15/01/2015), Ikemefuna R. Okoye (15/06/2015) and Hilary Opara (17/07/2015) will go in 2015 and the other two (Mrs. Chintua Amajor-Onu and Dr. Mrs. Grace Chita Okudo) will retire in 2016. This is because of deliberate long delays in promoting them alongside their counterparts from other parts of the country. They are victims of “promotion dormancy policy” in the NPF inflicted on the police officers of Southeast geopolitical zone. The duo of CPs Hilary Opara and Felix Osita Uyanna had their last promotions as CPs on 18/12/2006 and 16/10/2007 respectively, a period of almost eight and seven years respectively.

CPs From Southeast Zone: The eight(8) serving Commissioners of Police from Southeast and their birth, enlistment, promotion and retirement dates are as follows: 1. Hilary Opara (Imo State), birth: 31/07/55, enlistment: 17/07/80, promotion: 18/12/2006, retirement: 17/07/2015. 2. Felix Osita Uyanna (Anambra State), birth: 01/05/55, enlistment: 18/07/80, promotion: 06/10/2007, retirement: 05/01/2015. 3. Godfrey E. Okeke( Anambra State), birth: 16/09/54, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 20/12/2010, retirement: 16/09/2014. 4. Chintua Amajor-Onu(Mrs.)( Abia State), birth: 12/07/56, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 20/12/2010, retirement: 12/07/2016. 5. Ikechukwu Aduba (Anambra State), birth: 09/07/54, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 20/12/2010, retirement: 09/07/2014. 6. Sylvester A. Umeh(Enugu State), birth: 10/11/54, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 20/12/2010, retirement: 10/11/2014. 7. Ikemefuna R. Okoye (Anambra State), birth: 15/06/55, enlistment: 01/12/81, promotion: 20/12/2010, retirement: 15/06/2015. 8. Mrs. Grace Chita Okudo(medical doctor)(Ebonyi State), birth: 09/02/56, enlistment: 13/06/83, promotion: 20/12/2012, retirement: 09/02/2016.

CPs From Northwest Zone: The twenty-one (21) CPs and their birth, enlistment, promotion and retirement dates are as follows: 1. Ibrahim M. Maishanu (Sokoto State), birth: 11/10/59, enlistment: 01/01/84, promotion: 01/01/2009, retirement: 01/01/2019. 2. Lawal Tanko (Kaduna State), birth: 14/03/57, enlistment: 01/01/84, promotion: 20/12/2010, retirement: 14/03/2017. 3. Buhari Tanko (Kano State), birth: 03/02/56, enlistment: 01/01/84, promotion: 20/12/2010, retirement: 03/02/2016. 4. Mohammed A. Indabawa( Kano State), birth:12/04/56, enlistment: 30/07/79, promotion: 20/12/2010, retirement: 30/07/2014. 5. Mohammed Ibrahim Sumaila(Kano State), birth: 30/11/55, enlistment: 30/07/79, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 30/07/2014. 6. Mohammed Ladan(Kano State), birth: 05/05/54, enlistment: 30/07/79, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 30/07/2014. 7. Umar Gwadabe(Kano State), birth: 20/02/56, enlistment: 30/07/79, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 30/07/2014. 8. Sanusi A. Rufai (Katsina State), birth: 27/08/57, enlistment: 01/08/80, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 01/08/2015. 9. Musa Katsina Mohammed (Katsina State), birth: 1959, enlistment: 01/02/86, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 01/02/2019.

Others are 10. Usman Tili Abubakar ( Kebbi State), birth: 15/10/59, enlistment: 01/02/86, promotion: 01/08/2012, retirement: 15/10/2019. 11. Ahmed Ibrahim (Kano State), birth: 06/05/57, enlistment: 01/08/80, promotion: 30/01/2013, retirement: 01/08/2015. 12. Maigari Abbati Dikko (Katsina State), birth: 16/03/61, enlistment: 01/02/86, promotion: 03/04/2013, retirement: 01/02/2021. 13. Umaru U. Shehu (Kebbi State), birth: 18/06/58, enlistment: 01/02/86, promotion: 03/04/2013, retirement: 18/06/2018. 14. Saidu Madawaki ( Kebbi State), birth: 05/05/58, enlistment: 30/07/79, promotion: 03/04/2013, retirement: 30/07/2014. 15. Ibrahim Adamu (Zamfara State), birth: 20/11/58, enlistment: 01/02/86, promotion: 24/09/2013, retirement: 20/11/2018. 16. Abdul Dahiru Danwawu (Kano State), birth: 20/10/60, enlistment: 01/02/86, promotion: 24/09/2013, retirement: 26/10/2020. 17. Salisu Fagge Abdullahi (Kano State), birth: 01/07/58, enlistment: 01/02/86, promotion: 24/09/2013, retirement: 01/02/2018. 18. Lawal Shehu (Katsina State), birth: 24/12/60, enlistment: 15/03/88, promotion: 24/09/2013, retirement: 24/12/2020. 19. Nyats Nyehsu Jatau (Kaduna State), birth: 15/12/56, enlistment: 01/08/80, promotion: 04/10/2013, retirement: 01/08/2015. 20. Mohammed K. Mohammed (Katsina State), birth: 02/06/57, enlistment: 01/08/81, promotion: 21/01/2014, retirement: 01/08/2016. 21. Hurdi D. Abubakar Mohammed (Jigawa State), birth: 05/02/62, enlistment: 15/03/88, promotion: 21/01/2014, retirement: 05/02/2022.

CPs From North-central Zone: The eighteen (18) CPs from the North-central zone are 1. Umaru Abubakar Manko (Niger State), 2. Joel Kayode Theophilus (Kogi State), 3. Wilfred Eje Obute (Benue State), 4. James Olorundare Aronito (Kogi State), 5. Ibrahim K. Idris (Niger State), 6. Shuaibu L. Gambo( Niger State), 7. John A.B. Opadokun (Kwara State), 8. Waheed Olayinka Salau( Kwara State), 9. Dorothy A. Gimba (Plateau State), 10. Salihu Garba (Niger State), 11. Kudu Nma (Niger State), 12. Usman Yakubu (Niger State), 13. Abdulmajid Ali (Niger State), 14. Abubakar Adamu Mohammed (Nasarawa State), 15. Abdul Salami Iyaji ( Kogi State), 16. Yakubu O. Jibrin ( Nasarawa State), 17. Abimbola Macaulay (Kwara State), 18. Usman Isa Baba (Nasarawa State).

Sirs, please see part three of this important letter for our conclusion and demands. It is our hope that the letter in its completeness will be expeditiously looked into and issues of extreme importance raised therein addressed frontally. CLICK TO READ PART 3 OF THIS WRITE-UP.

Yours Faithfully,
International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law-Intersociety

Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman of the Board
+234(0)8033601078, +234(0)8180103912
emekaumeagbalasi@yahoo.co.uk, botchairman@intersociety-ng.org

Comrade Justus Uche Ijeoma, Head, Publicity Desk
+234(0)8037114869

CC:
1. The Inspector General of Police, Force Headquarters, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria
2. Chairman, Police Service Commission, the PSC Headquarters, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria
3. Chairman of Southeast Governors’ Forum & Governor of Anambra State, Awka, Nigeria

Emeka Umeagbalasi

Photo Above: Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman, Board of Trustees, Intersociety, 41, Miss Elems Street, Fegge, Onitsha, Anambra State, Nigeria.
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02/04/14

*SpecialReport 4/2/2014: Unmasking "Dogari" Policy In The Nigeria Police Force - Part 1

By Intersociety

Ref.: Intersociety/SE/NG/02/014/FGN/ABJ/FRN

1. His Excellency
Dr. Goodluck Ebele Jonathan
President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria & Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces
Thro
Senator Anyim Pius Anyim, Secretary to the Government of the Federation
The SGF Office, Shehu Shagari Complex
Three Arms Zone, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

2. Senator David Mark, President of the Senate, Federal Republic of Nigeria
Thro
The Chairman, Senate Committee on Police Affairs
The Senate Chambers, National Assembly Complex
Three Arms Zones, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

3. Honourable Aminu Tambuwal
Speaker, House of Representatives, Federal Republic of Nigeria
Thro
The Chairman, House Committee on Police Affairs
The House of Reps Chambers, National Assembly Complex
Three Arms Zone, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

4. Prof. Shuaibu Oba AbdulRaheem
Executive Chairman, Federal Character Commission
The FCC Headquarters, Plot 64, First Avenue
Off Shehu Shagari Way, Maitama
FCT, Abuja, Nigeria

Sirs,

Unmasking “Dogari/Dansanda” Policy In The Nigeria Police Force & A Case Against Sectional Domination In Promotions & Postings Of Key Officers In The Force (Part One)

(Onitsha Nigeria, 4th day of February, 2014)-In our last letter (Averting Chaos & Bloodletting In 2015 General Polls) to the Presidency and the leaderships of the National Assembly, dated 13th day of January, 2014, one of our demands was the presidential intervention in the lopsided promotions and postings characterizing the present leadership of the Nigeria Police Force, headed by the Inspector General of the Police, Mr. Mohammed Dahiru Abubakar. Sadly, the wicked policy has not only continued, but also risen to an apogee, to the extent that one of Nigeria’s leading federating partners: Southeast geopolitical zone is in a verge of being erased in the high command hierarchy of the Nigeria Police Force, through the policies of “promotion dormancy and tea-making duty assignments/postings”.

Except drastic constitutional measures, such as immediate intervention of the President, in his capacity as “Chairman of the Nigeria Police Council” and “Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces”, are taken urgently; otherwise, no senior police officer of Southeast extraction will occupy the rank of AIG in the immediate time and DIG in the next ten years or more, not to talk of becoming an IGP. Already, except timely presidential intervention, Southeast zone has lost the possibility of producing the next Inspector General of Police when the present IGP, Mr. Mohammed D. Abubakar retires on 30th July, 2014, having lost the headship of the Army in recent shake up in the Service Chiefs.

This is because no senior police officer from the zone presently serves as AIG, out of the country’s 21 serving AIGs and the only serving DIG from the zone (Emmanuel Kachi Udeoji) will retire on 9th of September, 2014. The Southeast case is made worse by the fact that out of eight (8) serving CPs from the zone, three will retire this year (2014), three next year (2015) and two next two years (2016). The present IGP (M.D. Abubakar), who will retire in next six months (30th July), was appointed IGP on 25th of January, 2012. By the end of his tenure, he would have served two years and six months as IGP.

It is recalled that the leadership of this organization- International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law-Intersociety, had in May 2013 made two representations to the President & Commander-in-Chief over lopsided promotions and postings in the Nigeria Police Force high command(esp. ACPs to IGP), which gravely violates the Constitution of Nigeria 1999 including her Section 14 (3). The letters were predicated on promotions carried on 3rd of April, 2013 by the Police Service Commission, which said it acted based on “IGP’s recommendations”. The seeming inaction of the President & Commander-in-Chief, emboldened the prompters and promoters of this “dogari policy”, to the extent that it has become a wicked norm in the present leadership of the NPF.

Since then, three sets of promotions, “on the recommendations of the IGP”, have been carried out with patently lopsidedness and gross breach of the federal character principle. In the September 27, 2013 promotions, four (4) CPs (Ballah Mogaji Nasarawa- Kebi State, Northwest), Mohammed J. Gana( Niger State, North-central), Sabo Ringim (Jigawa State, Northwest) and Edgar Tam Nanakumo (Bayelsa State, South-south) were elevated to the rank of AIG. Shockingly, no senior police officer from Southeast zone was among those promoted. The promotion exercise also involved elevation of eight (8) DCPs to CPs, seven (7) ACPs to DCPs and twenty (20) CSPs to ACPs. In the December 19, 2013 promotions, made public by the IGP on 20th of January, 2014, AIGs Michael E. Zuokumor (Bayelsa State, South-south) and Jonathan Johnson ( Taraba State, Northeast) were made DIGs, while CPs Fana Abdullahi Salihu (Kebbi State, Northwest), Musa Abdulsalam Daura (Katsina State, Northwest) and Kakwe Christopher Katso (Taraba State, Northeast) were elevated to the rank of AIG. Out of these promotions, no senior police officer from Southeast was among. This is in spite of the fact that Southeast has two serving CPs, who have remained in the rank of CP since 2006 and 2007 respectively.

In the last promotions that took place on 21st of January, 2014, six (6) DCPs were made Commissioners of Police. They are Aminchi Samaila Baraya (Taraba State, Northeast), Hurdi D. Abubakar Mohammed, (Kebbi State, Northwest), Usman Alkali Baba (Yobe State, Northeast), Tijani Baba (Yobe State, Northeast), Mohammed K. Mohammed (Katsina State, Northwest) and Victor O.E. Onofiok (Akwa Ibom State, South-south). In the above promotions, none of them came from Southeast zone. This is despite the fact that the zone has twenty (20) serving DCPs including three (3) that will retire this year (2014). Also, nine (9) ACPs were promoted to DCPs in the exercise. They are Olukolu Shina Tairu (Lagos State, Southwest), Omololu Shamsiden Bishi (Lagos State, Southwest), Isaac Akinmoyede Olutayo (Lagos State, Southwest), Tijani Babatunde Olasupo (Kwara State, North-central) and Okon Ene Etim (Cross River State, South-south).

Others are Aminu Pai Saleh (FCT/North-central), Makama Usman Hamisu (Plateau State, North-central), Aminu Koji Kwabe (Adamawa State, Northeast) and Chris Mbazor (Ebonyi State, Southeast) who will retire on 26/11/2014, having been born on 03/09/56 and enlisted on 26/11/79. Eight (8) CSPs were elevated to the rank of ACP and they are Alonge Adebowale (Lagos State, Southwest), Augustina Nwuka Ogbodo (Enugu State, Southeast), Polycap Chilaka Dibia (Enugu State, Southeast), Bello Tajudeen Olanrewaju (Kwara State, North-central), David Dangiwa Dantata (Kaduna State, Northwest), Anthony Okon (Akwa Ibom State, South-south) and Babangida Adam Zannah (Borno State, Northeast).

Further Authoritative Findings: Our further authoritative findings from high quarters of the Nigeria Police Force have continued to show shocking lopsidedness and sectional promotions and postings of senior officers in the Force. The lopsided and despicable policy appears worst under the present IGP, Mr. Mohammed D. Abubakar, who became IGP on 25th January, 2012. According to an authoritative NPF document seen by our field team of investigators led by Emeka Umeagbalasi; a criminologist and security expert; in addition to an investigation carried out on the last promotions’ exercise of 21st of January, 2014, there are one(1) serving Inspector General of Police (IGP), seven(7) Deputy Inspectors General (DIGs), twenty-one (21) serving Assistant Inspectors General (AIGs) including one specialist, eighty-eight (88) serving Commissioners of Police(CPs) including four specialists, one hundred & seventy-two (172) Deputy Commissioners of Police (DCPs) including fifteen specialists, three hundred & ninety-eight (398) Assistant Commissioners of Police (ACPs) including fifteen specialists and nine hundred and six (906) Chief Superintendents of Police (CSPs) including thirty-five specialists. The list of “IGP-CSPs” under reference was updated to 23rd day of January, 2014. According to the list thoroughly investigated by our team, there are a total of one thousand, five hundred & eighty-six (1,586) serving senior police officers in the Nigeria Police Force occupying the ranks of IGP to CSPs as at 31st day of January, 2014. This is in addition to last promotions under reference (21/01/2014) per PSC (Police Service Commission) website.

Serving IGP & DIGs: Out of seven serving DIGs in the Force, the Northwest geopolitical zone, which produces the present IGP, Mr. Mohammed D. Abubakar, also produces two DIGs in the persons of Suleiman Dauda Fakai from Kebbi State and Atiku Yusuf Kafur from Katsina State. The remaining five geopolitical zones have one DIG each and they are Abdurahaman Akano from Osun State (Southwest), Peter Yisa Gana from Niger State (North-central), Emmanuel Kachi Udeoji from Abia State (Southeast), Michael E. Zuokumor from Bayelsa State (South-south) and Jonathan Johnson from Taraba State (Northeast). The birth, enlistment and retirement dates of the IGP and the seven DIGs and their educational qualifications are as follows: 1. Mohammed D. Abubakar (IGP), birth: 05/05/58, enlistment: 30/07/79, retirement: 30/07/2014, educational qualification: Dip., Public Administration & Criminal Justice. He was promoted IGP on 25/01/2012. 2. Suleiman Dauda Fakai (DIG), birth: 01/11/59, enlistment: 01/01/84, retirement: 01/01/2019, educational qualification: B.Sc., PGD, Geography, Policy & Administration. He was promoted DIG on 22/02/2012. 3. Atiku Yusuf Kafur (DIG), birth: 07/07/57, enlistment: 08/12/82, retirement: 07/07/2017, educational qualification: B.A., Education/History. He was promoted DIG on 22/02/2012.

Others are: 4. Peter Yisa Gana (DIG), birth: 15/11/59, enlistment: 31/12/84, retirement: 15/11/2019, educational qualification: B.Sc., M.Sc., Policing & Public Order. He was promoted on 22/02/2012. 5. Emmanuel Kachi Udeoji (DIG), birth: 09/09/54, enlistment: 15/07/80, retirement: 09/09/2014, educational qualification: B.Sc., LLB, Sociology & Law. He was promoted DIG on 22/02/2012. 6. Abdurahaman Akano (DIG), birth: 22/06/54, enlistment: 31/12/84, retirement: 22/06/2014, educational qualification: B.A., LLB, English & Law. He was promoted DIG on 22/01/2012. 7. Michael E. Zuokumor (DIG), birth: 14/04/56, enlistment: 01/08/80, retirement: 01/08/2015, educational qualification: B.A., LLB, M.Sc., Law &History. He was promoted DIG on 15/01/2014. 8. Jonathan Johnson (DIG), birth: 23/09/55, enlistment: 03/07/79, retirement: 03/07/2014, education: Teachers’ College (Grade 11). He was promoted DIG on 15/01/2014. A careful look at the foregoing clearly shows that apart from damaging geopolitical lopsidedness, there are also no women among the seven serving DIGs in the NPF. The geopolitical representation of the seven DIGs is utterly lopsided as it is totally wrong to allow the Northwest zone that produces the present IGP to also produce two DIGs.

Sirs, please see part two and three of this important letter for continuation and conclusion. It is our hope that the letter in its completeness will be expeditiously looked into and issues of extreme importance raised therein addressed frontally. CLICK TO READ PART 2 OF THIS WRITE-UP.

Yours Faithfully,
International Society for Civil Liberties & the Rule of Law-Intersociety

Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman of the Board
+234(0)8033601078, +234(0)8180103912
emekaumeagbalasi@yahoo.co.uk, botchairman@intersociety-ng.org

Comrade Justus Uche Ijeoma, Head, Publicity Desk
+234(0)8037114869

CC:
1. The Inspector General of Police, Force Headquarters, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria
2. Chairman, Police Service Commission, the PSC Headquarters, FCT, Abuja, Nigeria
3. Chairman of Southeast Governors’ Forum & Governor of Anambra State, Awka, Nigeria

Emeka Umeagbalasi

Photo Above: Emeka Umeagbalasi, Chairman, Board of Trustees, Intersociety, 41, Miss Elems Street, Fegge, Onitsha, Anambra State, Nigeria.
- CLICK FOR ANOTHER PHOTO.

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